Psychology News

  • Impact of Major Life-Events on Well-being
    A new Australian study compares the impact of eighteen major life events on well-being. The research is unique and is the first to look at how significant life issues influence our emotions or happiness, and our life satisfaction. As we all know, life is full of ups and downs. Major ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-06-05
  • Study: CBT is Best Therapy for Reducing Inflammation
    Psychological and behavioral therapies, particularly cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), may be effective non-drug treatments for reducing disease-causing inflammation in the body, according to a new review published in the journal JAMA Psychiatry. For the study, a research team reviewed 56 randomized clinical trials to see whether psychotherapies, typically used for ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-06-05
  • Female College Students More Affected Academically By High Alcohol Use Than Men
    A new study suggests that female college students may be more affected by high alcohol use than men, which can lead to less interest in academics. For the study, a research team from Binghamton University, State University of New York administered an anonymous survey that assessed college students’ alcohol use ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-06-05
  • Common Mental Health Disorders Caused by Adversity, not Chemistry?
    Emerging research suggests some of the most common mental disorders including depression, anxiety and PTSD, might not be disorders at all, rather a response to adversity. As such, an effective strategy for the afflictions may be to find a social or cultural solution. In the study, Washington State University biological ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-06-05
  • Negative Emotions Can Fuel Emotional Eating
    New research finds that eating and especially overeating in response to negative emotions is a risk factor for binge eating and developing eating disorders such as bulimia. Eating can serve different functions such as survival, pleasure, comfort, as well as a response to stress. Emotional overeating — eating past the ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-06-04
  • For Dreaded Tasks, Do You Put It Off or Get It Over With?
    When we’re looking forward to something fun, such as going on vacation, most people try to make it happen as soon as possible. But when it comes to dreaded tasks, like getting a root canal, why do some people procrastinate while others get it over with right away? New research ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-06-04
  • Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual Older Adults May See Greater Risk of Substance Abuse
    Adults over 50 who identify as lesbian, gay, or bisexual may be at greater risk of substance use than those who are heterosexual, according to a new study led by New York University (NYU) Grossman School of Medicine and the Center for Drug Use and HIV/HCV Research (CDUHR) at NYU ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-06-04
  • Domestic Violence Seen As Rising During COVID-19 Lockdown
    A new study of Los Angeles and Indianapolis police calls has found an increase in domestic violence reports ever since stay-at-home restrictions were implemented in March in response to the  coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. The research team, led by the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), consists of a group of ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-06-04
  • Integrating Behavioral and Medical Health Services Still A Work in Progress
    Although the time has come, we are still not there regarding integrating behavioral health services into physician medical practices. New research discovers optimal integration remains limited by cultural and financial barriers. However, providing technical support and improved payment models may enhance the long-term sustainability of the approach, according to the ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-06-03
  • Strong Convictions Can Blind Us to Info That Contradicts Our Beliefs
    When people are highly confident in a decision or a belief, they only take in information that confirms their decision, failing to process information that contradicts it, according to a new brain imaging study. The study helps explain the neural processes that contribute to the confirmation bias entrenched in most ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-06-03
  • Study Finds Widening Gap Between Rich and Poor Neighborhoods
    A new study conducted in Columbus, Ohio, demonstrates how housing prices and neighborhood values have become polarized in some urban areas, with the rich getting richer and the poor getting poorer. A research team at Ohio State University’s Center for Urban and Regional Analysis (CURA) used a high-resolution housing transactions ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-06-03
  • Study Finds Link Between Gut Mucus and Brain Disorders
    A new study adds to the growing evidence that the gut and the brain are significantly connected, but this time the findings point to gut mucus. Gut mucus is the body’s first line of defense against bad bacteria in our gut. Bacterial imbalance in the gut has been associated with ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-06-02
  • Socially Isolated Kids in COVID-19 Lockdown May Be at Greater Risk for Depression
    A new U.K. study suggests that lonely and socially isolated children are likely to experience high rates of depression and anxiety long after the current lockdown is over and that clinicians need to be prepared for a future spike in demand. “From our analysis, it is clear there are strong ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-06-02
  • Depression Seen Differently When Thought Of As Biological
    People who think depression is caused by biological factors also tend to believe the disorder is more severe and longer lasting, compared to those who see less of a role for biological causes, according to a new study at Rutgers University in New Jersey. At the same time, people who ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-06-01
  • Older Men Seem Least Worried About COVID-19
    A new study finds that older men are less likely to worry about catching or dying from COVID-19 than women their age or younger people of both sexes. The finding is concerning because older men are already at greater risk of severe or fatal COVID-19 infections. The results are published ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-06-01

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