Psychology News

  • Refugees in US Look for Job Opportunities, Social Networks
    In their search for opportunity and community, refugees in the U.S. appear just as resourceful as other immigrants. In fact, many refugees move to other states soon upon arrival in search of better job opportunities, according to a new study published in the journal Science Advances. The study was conducted ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-08-11
  • More Formal Education May Delay Initial Signs of Cognitive Decline
    Staying in school for a longer period of time has been linked to better cognitive function and a reduced risk for dementia. Because of this, some experts have proposed that prolonging education in childhood through early adulthood may protect against overall cognitive aging. Now a new study finds that people ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-08-11
  • GI Symptoms Often Tied to Behavioral Problems in Preschoolers
    New research finds that common gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms such as diarrhea, constipation and bloating are linked to troubled sleep, self-harm and physical complaints in preschool children. University of California – Davis investigators also said GI symptoms are much more common and potentially disruptive in young kids with autism. “Clinicians and ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-08-11
  • Health & Fitness Tech May Have Unexpected Downsides
    Health apps and fitness watches can shed light on how our bodies are working and help promote a healthy lifestyle. But a new Danish study finds that for some, they can also ramp up anxiety. The study examined the experiences of 27 heart patients who used Fitbit fitness watches to ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-08-10
  • Solitary Outdoor Activities Help Kids Bond With Nature
    Solitary outdoor activities like fishing, hunting or exploring outside may be key to building strong bonds between children and nature, according to a new study published in The Journal of Environmental Education. As an extension of these solitary activities, the researchers also found that engaging in outdoor social activities, such ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-08-10
  • Transgender, Gender-Diverse Adults More Likely to Be Autistic
    Transgender and gender-diverse adults are three to six times more likely to be diagnosed as autistic, according to a new study. The new study, conducted by scientists at the University of Cambridge’s Autism Research Centre in England, used data from more than 600,000 adults. Researchers say their study confirms previous ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-08-10
  • E-Mail Style May Suggest Personality Traits
    A new theory suggests that the way in which we communicate online, via email and social media, reveals much about our personality and character types. Psychologists from the Universities of Bath and Cardiff in the U.K. point to clear differences in electronic communication styles between autistic and non-autistic people. Moreover, ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-08-09
  • Major Depressive Episodes Far More Common Than Once Thought
    A new study finds that the number of adults in the United States who suffer from major depressive episodes at some point in their lives is far higher than previously believed. According to researchers at the Yale School of Public Health, national survey data shows that approximately 17 percent of ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-08-09
  • Placebos Can Ease Stress – Even When People Know They’re Placebos
    Placebo interventions have been shown to be a cost-effective way to manage a variety of disorders and symptoms. However, an important ethical issue prevents their widespread use: The common belief that for placebos to work, the patients needs to be deceived into thinking they are taking an active treatment. Now ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-08-09
  • New Protocol Reduces Post-Op Opioid Use
    While opioids effectively relieve pain, for some they lead to overuse and addiction. New research suggests planning that emphasizes a person’s surgical care before, during and after surgery can reduce or even eliminate the need for opioids. University of Pennsylvania researchers discovered a majority of patients who followed an “Enhanced ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-08-08
  • COVID-19 Creates Perfect Storm for Conspiracy Theories
    The worldwide COVID-19 pandemic has created what the World Health Organization calls an “infodemic,” giving conspiracy groups a bigger platform than ever before. This led researchers at the Digital Media Research Centre at Queensland University of Technology (QUT) in Australia to take a deep dive into social media to trace ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-08-08
  • Study: As Body Weight Increases, Brain Function Drops
    A new brain imaging study of thousands of people reveals that a person’s body weight has a surprising impact on brain function. The results show that as body weight increases, all brain regions show a drop in activity and blood flow. The good news is that brain function can improve ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-08-08
  • Loneliness Looks Different at Different Ages
    Loneliness in adults is experienced differently depending on age, according to new research. The new study concludes that there can be no “one size fits all” approach to reducing loneliness, as factors associated with it, such as contact with friends and family, perceived health or employment, may differ across the ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-08-08
  • Keeping Up With The Joneses Leads to Worse Psychological and Physical Health for White People
    Before the era of the COVID-19 pandemic, research suggested that premature deaths among white Americans were rising. Even before the era of COVID-19, these findings were surprising, according to researchers. “These trends were puzzling to us because white people, on average, have more wealth than other racial groups and are ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-08-07
  • Taking Time to Enjoy the Pleasures of Life Brings Happiness
    New research suggests acts of hedonism such as relaxing on the couch or enjoying a delicious meal contribute to a happy life as much as self-control. Investigators from the University of Zurich and Radboud University in the Netherlands found the capacity to experience pleasure or enjoyment without getting distracted by ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-08-07

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