Psychology News

  • New Communication Strategies Help Alzheimer’s Couples
    A new first-of-its-kind study has found that caregiver-partner communication can improve among couples as they attempt to manage dementia, but it takes practice. For these couples, the communication strategies they have used before simply do not work anymore. Impaired communication leads to misunderstandings, conflict, isolation, and loss of intimacy. The ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-02-22
  • Perceptions of God Impact Conservative and Liberal Attitudes
    New research suggests Republicans who believe that God is highly engaged with humanity are like Democrats — more liberal — when it comes to social and economic justice issues. The Baylor University study proposes that some types of theology make conservatives more “compassionate,” while others make liberals “harsher.” “Partisanship explains ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-02-22
  • Bolstering Self-Concept in Young Mental Health Patients May Aid in Treatment
    New research suggests an important part of treatment for young mental health patients — especially those in a hospital setting — is improving how they perceive themselves, according to a study from the University of Waterloo. Researchers found that youth with psychiatric disorders receiving inpatient services reported lower self-concept — particularly global ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-02-21
  • Both Older and Younger Siblings Impact Each Other’s Empathy Levels
    A new multi-university study finds that both older and younger siblings, even toddlers, can have a significant influence on the other’s capacity for empathy. The study, published in the journal Child Development, was conducted by researchers at the University of Calgary, Universite Laval in Quebec City, Tel Aviv University, and ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-02-21
  • Social Media Does Not Significantly Harm Adolescent Academic Performance
    Despite widespread concern among parents and educators, using social media may not adversely impact teens’ academic performance, according to a new study in Educational Psychology Review. “Concerns regarding the allegedly disastrous consequences of social networking sites on school performance are unfounded,” said Professor Markus Appel, a psychologist who holds the Chair ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-02-21
  • The Good News and Bad News: You’re Out of A Job
    It’s said that, “When you hit rock bottom, there’s nowhere to go but up.” That can prove especially true in business, where bottoming out after job loss can be necessary before finding the radical solution that will lead to a new work identity, according to new research from the University ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-02-21
  • Excess Calcium May Influence Development of Parkinson’s
    Emerging research suggests excess levels of calcium in brain cells may lead to the formation of toxic protein clusters that characterize Parkinson’s disease. Parkinson’s disease is one of a number of neurodegenerative diseases caused when naturally occurring proteins fold into the wrong shape and stick together with other proteins. The ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-02-20
  • Sleep May Be Essential for Learning and Forgetting
    Why do people and other animals sicken and die if they are deprived of sleep? What is it about sleep that makes it so essential? A new study, published in Science, shows evidence that in fact humans sleep to forget some of the things they learn each day — maintaining the ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-02-20
  • College Roommates May Underestimate Each Other’s Distress
    Although college can be an exciting time, many students feel extreme pressure to succeed both academically and socially, and this can lead to serious distress. A new study at New York University (NYU) finds that even someone as close as a roommate may not recognize just how stressed their living ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-02-20
  • Teens With Stroke at Birth Use Opposite Side of Brain for Language
    In a new study, researchers observed young people who had left-brain stroke damage at birth and found they are now using the right side of the brain for language — in the exact, mirror-opposite region to the normal language areas on the left side. At least one in 4,000 newborn babies ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-02-19
  • Brain Imaging Can Predict CBT Effectiveness for OCD
    Researchers at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), have developed a new method to predict whether a person with obsessive compulsive disorder would benefit from cognitive behavioral therapy. Obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) is a challenging, life-long mental health disorder marked by repetitive thoughts and actions that can seriously impair ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-02-19
  • Alzheimer’s Signs Reversed in Mouse Study
    Researchers have successfully reversed the formation of amyloid plaques in the brains of mice with Alzheimer’s disease, thereby improving the animals’ cognitive function. Investigators from the Cleveland Clinic Lerner Research Institute discovered that gradually depleting an enzyme called BACE1 eliminates the plaques. The study, which appears in the Journal of ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-02-19
  • Social Media Can Help Start Healing Process
    In a new study, investigators at Drexel University examined how and why women decide to disclose pregnancy loss on Facebook. Their findings shed light on a shift in our social media behavior that is making it easier for people to come forward and share their painful, personal, and often stigmatized ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-02-19
  • Blood and Urine Tests Developed to Diagnose Autism
    New blood and urine tests that can indicate autism in children have been developed by researchers in England. The researchers, who discovered a link between autism and damage to proteins in blood plasma, say the tests could led to earlier detection of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and earlier intervention. “We ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-02-18
  • Many Struggling Readers Have Binocular Vision Problems
    A new Canadian study finds that many elementary school children who read below grade level have challenges with their eyesight — even if standard tests say their vision is 20/20. Researchers from the University of Waterloo found that one-third of a group of children with reading difficulties tested below-normal in ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-02-18

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