Psychology News

  • Untreated Diabetes Tied to Faster Dementia Progression
    In a new study, psychologists from the University of Southern California (USC) found that patients with untreated diabetes developed signs of Alzheimer’s disease 1.6 times faster than people without diabetes. The research is published in the journal Diabetes Care. “Our findings emphasize the importance of catching diabetes or other metabolic ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-03-26
  • Study: Gay, Lesbian Neighborhoods Becoming More Diverse
    Gay and lesbian spaces in cities are diversifying and spreading out rather than disappearing, according to a new study at the University of British Columbia (UBC). It is commonly believed that major urban cities have just one gay neighborhood — or “gayborhood” — where all gay people live, and the rest ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-03-25
  • Childhood Trauma May Affect Brain Structure, Leading to More Severe Depression
    Childhood trauma may alter the structure of the brain in a way that makes clinical depression more likely to be severe and recurrent, according to new research published in The Lancet Psychiatry journal. Some studies have shown a link between maltreatment and altered brain structure, while others have shown a ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-03-25
  • Study: Teens Who Choose Solitude Know What’s Best for Them
    Young people who choose solitude may be doing what is best for themselves, according to a new study published in the Journal of Adolescence. The findings suggest that spending a lot of time alone isn’t necessarily a red flag for isolation or depression, but the key factor here is “choice.” ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-03-25
  • Infection in Pregnancy Tied to Greater Risk of Autism, Depression in Kids
    Individuals whose mothers were hospitalized for an infection during pregnancy are at greater risk for autism and depression, according to a new Swedish study of nearly 1.8 million children. “The results indicate that safeguarding against and preventing infection during pregnancy as far as possible by, for instance, following flu vaccination ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-03-24
  • REM Sleep Disorder Linked to Parkinson’s
    In a new multi-center study of more than 1,200 people, Canadian researchers discovered rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder is a strong predictor of Parkinson’s disease. The study, led by Dr. Ron Postuma at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital followed 1,280 patients with rapid eye movement (REM) sleep ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-03-24
  • Eating Breakfast with Parents Tied to Better Body Image for Kids
    A new study has found that consistently eating breakfast as a family might promote positive body image for children and adolescents. “We know that developing healthy behaviors in adolescence, such as eating breakfast every day and eating family meals, can have long-term effects into adulthood,” said Dr. Virginia Ramseyer Winter, ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-03-24
  • Altered Neuron Growth May Be Why Some Depressed People Don’t Respond to SSRIs
    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are the most commonly prescribed medication for major depressive disorder (MDD), yet scientists still do not understand why they don’t work in nearly 30 percent of patients. A new study by researchers at the Salk Institute in La Jolla, California, discovered differences in growth patterns ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-03-24
  • Childhood Anxiety Linked to Later Problems With Alcohol
    New research has found evidence that children and adolescents with higher levels of anxiety may be at a greater risk of developing alcohol problems. Many studies have investigated the relationship between anxiety and alcohol use, but the evidence has been unclear, say researchers at the University of Bristol in the ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-03-23
  • Recipe for Creativity: Crank Out Ideas and Step Away
    A new study suggests there is an effective formula employers can use to unlock employees’ creative potential: Reward workers to generate an abundance of ideas — even mediocre ones — and then have them step away from the project for an “incubation period.” The findings, published in the journal Accounting Review, ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-03-23
  • ADHD Drug May Increase Risk of Psychosis in Young People
    A new “Big Data” study finds that teens and young people with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) who begin treatment with amphetamine medications are at greater risk for psychosis. The research looked at the two most common ADHD treatments and found that, although the risk of psychosis is low, it is higher ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-03-23
  • Many in Addiction Recovery Face Chronic Health Issues
    More than a third of people recovering from addiction continue to suffer from chronic physical disease, according to a new study conducted by researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) Recovery Research Institute. The research, published in the Journal of Addiction Medicine, is the first to look at the national prevalence ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-03-22
  • Delusions May Stem from ‘Sticky’ Beliefs
    A study published in the journal Brain offers new insights into the development of delusions — false beliefs that are rigidly held with strong conviction despite contradictory evidence. Based on the findings, the researchers framed delusions as “sticky” beliefs that tend to evolve in an unusually slow manner. An estimated 80-90 ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-03-22
  • Eating Nuts for Years Tied to Better Cognition in Older Adults
    People who consume just a handful of nuts each day for several years can significantly improve their cognitive function in old age, according to a new study from the University of South Australia (UniSA). The research, which involved 4,822 Chinese adults ages 55 and older, shows that eating more than ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-03-21
  • Some Autistic Kids Are In Tune with Mom’s Emotions
    For children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), recognizing facial expressions in others is especially challenging. New research, however, finds that some ASD children display skilled and proficient emotional processing skills when viewing their mother’s faces. Typically, ASD children show impairments in social interactions including a lack of interest in initiating ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-03-21

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