Psychology News

  • PTSD Symptoms Improve Most When Patient Chooses Treatment
    Individuals with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) who receive their preferred form of treatment — whether drugs or therapy — are more likely to improve compared to those who are randomly prescribed the non-preferred treatment. That is the finding of a new large-scale clinical trial conducted by researchers from the University of Washington ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-10-21
  • How Schools Can Best Support Kids with ADHD
    In a new paper, published in the Review of Education, U.K. researchers offer new guidelines on how school personnel can best help students with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) to improve academics and help minimize symptoms. For the review, researchers at the University of Exeter and the EPPI (Evidence for Policy and ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-10-21
  • Chronic Inflammation May Boost Genetic Risk of Alzheimer’s
    While having the ApoE4 gene is a major genetic risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease (AD), not all ApoE4 carriers develop the disease. But new research shows that ApoE4 coupled with chronic inflammation dramatically increases the risk of AD. This can be detected by sequential measurements of C-reactive protein, a common clinical ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-10-21
  • Using Virtual Reality as Tool to Foster Empathy
    New research suggests emerging technology can be a useful tool to encourage empathy, helpful behavior, and positive attitudes towards marginalized groups. In this case, technology in the form of Virtual Reality (VR) has been increasingly referred to as the “ultimate empathy machine” since it allows users to experience any situation ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-10-20
  • Parents Can Curb Kids’ Materialism
    Parents who are worried about their kids being materialistic can curb these tendencies, according to new research. And that’s good news, as materialism has been linked to a variety of mental health problems, such as anxiety and depression, as well as selfish attitudes and behaviors. “Our findings show that it ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-10-20
  • Migraine May Be Linked to ADHD in Adults
    A new Danish study has found a link between migraine and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in adults. The findings, published in the open access journal BMC Neurology, show the association is particularly pronounced in those who experience visual disturbances (aura) with migraine. Previous research has shown a link between migraine and ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-10-20
  • Is Herpes Virus Linked to Alzheimer’s Disease?
    A new paper provides compelling evidence that the herpes virus responsible for cold sores may also be linked to Alzheimer’s disease. The findings show that antiviral drugs drastically reduce the risk of senile dementia in patients with severe herpes infections. The review, published in the journal Frontiers in Ageing Neuroscience, ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-10-20
  • Kids with Autism or Developmental Delays Far More Likely to Be Overweight
    Children with developmental delays, including autism spectrum disorder (ASD), are up to 50 percent more likely to be overweight or obese compared to those in the general population, according to new research published online in The Journal of Pediatrics. The study, conducted by researchers at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP), ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-10-19
  • Aorta Stiffness May Be Key Risk Factor in Dementia
    Stiffness of the aorta, the largest artery in the body, may be a significant risk factor for developing dementia, according to new research from the University of Pittsburgh. The study, published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease, draws on data collected from hundreds of elderly adults for more than 15 ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-10-19
  • Selfishness Linked to Smaller Families, Lower Salary
    A new international study finds that unselfish behavior has rewards beyond being the “right” thing to do. Researchers discovered unselfish people tend both to have more children and to receive higher salaries, in comparison to more selfish people. Investigators from Stockholm University, the Institute for Futures Studies and the University ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-10-18
  • Residents of For-Profit Nursing Homes May Face Greater Risk of Neglect
    Older adults living in for-profit nursing homes may face nearly double the risk of developing health issues linked to substandard care compared with residents living in not-for-profit facilities or in homes in the community, according to a new study published in the journal Gerontology. “For-profit nursing facilities pay their high-level ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-10-18
  • Psychopathic Traits in Men May Help Them Emerge as Leaders
    A new study published online in the Journal of Applied Psychology reveals that psychopathic traits in men may help them emerge as leaders, but such tendencies in women are often punished. A psychopathic personality has three general characteristics: boldness in asserting dominance over others, being impulsive without inhibition and a ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-10-17
  • Laughter Can Impact Romantic Happiness & Sexuality
    German researchers have found that laughter, whether it is shared or is directed at the significant other, has an important impact on relationship happiness. If partners handle laughter or being laughed at in a similar way, they tend to be quite content with their relationship. People who are afraid of ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-10-17
  • Can Facebook Posts Reveal Who Will Develop Depression?
    A team of researchers from the University of Pennsylvania and Stony Brook University recently developed a new algorithm which was able to identify which Facebook users would be diagnosed with depression. For the study, the researchers analyzed social media data shared by consenting users for several months. Based on this ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-10-17
  • Mom’s Early Pregnancy Weight May Affect Baby’s Self-Regulation
    A woman’s weight in early pregnancy may influence how well her baby is able to self-regulate during the first months and years of life, according to a new Finnish study published in the journal Pediatric Research. Earlier research has shown that one in every five infants struggles to self-regulate in ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-10-16

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