Psychology News

  • Youth Suicide Breakdown May Pose Screening Opportunity for Medicaid
    Nearly four in 10 of all youth who died by suicide in 16 states between 2009 and 2013 were Medicaid enrollees, according to a new study. “Almost 40 percent of youth who died by suicide were covered by Medicaid, suggesting effective suicide screening of enrollees could substantially decrease suicide mortality ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-01-21
  • Ready Or Not, Most US Parents Believe Intensive Approach is Best
    A nationally representative survey of parents finds that most believe parenting is a hands-on, time-intensive process. Researchers found this belief among a strong majority of parents, regardless of their education, income or race. Investigators from Cornell University believe the findings suggest “intensive parenting” has become the dominant model across the ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-01-20
  • Mindfulness Tied to Fewer Menopausal Symptoms
    Mindfulness may be linked to fewer menopausal symptoms, particularly in women struggling with irritability, anxiety and depression, according to a new study published in Climacteric: The Journal of the International Menopause Society. Mindfulness is the ability to focus on the present moment while calmly acknowledging and accepting one’s feelings and ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-01-20
  • Dads Postnatal Depression Linked to Depression in their Teenage Daughters
    Emerging research finds that fathers as well as mothers can experience post-natal depression. Moreover, the condition can be linked to emotional problems for their teenage daughters. A new study from the University of Cambridge suggests almost one in 20 new fathers suffer depression in the weeks after their child was ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-01-20
  • Missing Doctor Appointments Linked to Increased Risk of Death – Especially for Those With Mental Health Conditions
    A new study finds that missing doctor appointments is associated with early death, with people who have long-term mental health conditions at particular risk. For the study, led by Dr. Ross McQueenie from the University of Glasgow along with colleagues from Lancaster University and the University of Aberdeen, the researchers ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-01-20
  • A Tilt of the Head Helps With Social Engagement – Especially for People with Autism
    When we look at another person’s face, we take in a flood of information — age, gender, race, expression, even their mood. Understanding how facial recognition works has great value, particularly for those whose brains process information in ways that make eye contact challenging, including people with autism. Helping people ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-01-20
  • Development of Psychological Boundaries Important for Young People
    An international research effort suggests a person’s culture plays less of a role in the formation of personal boundaries than individual, personal factors. These individual factors relate to the creation of personal sovereignty and self-esteem. The finding stems from a comparative analysis of the psychological boundaries of individuals living ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-01-20
  • Brief Happiness Exercises Can Boost Mood in Substance Abuse Recovery
    A new study suggests that taking a few minutes to engage in positive psychology exercises can significantly increase in-the-moment happiness in adults recovering from substance use disorders. The findings are published online in the Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment. “Addiction scientists are increasingly moving beyond the traditional focus on reducing ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-01-20
  • How Musicians Communicate Non-Verbally While Performing
    How do musicians intuitively move and play together as one single unit? In a new study, Canadian researchers used a novel technique to better understand how band members synchronize their musical expression and movements during a free-flowing performance. The results, published in the journal Scientific Reports, show that playing with ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-01-19
  • Frailty May Hike Risk of Dementia
    A new study has found that adults 59 years and older with higher levels of frailty were more likely to have both Alzheimer’s disease-related brain changes and symptoms of dementia. “By reducing an individual’s physiological reserve, frailty could trigger the clinical expression of dementia when it might remain asymptomatic in ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-01-19
  • ‘Exercise Snacks’ Through The Day Can Boost Health
    Just a few minutes of stair climbing in short bursts throughout the day can improve cardiovascular health, according to a new Canadian study published in the journal Applied Physiology, Nutrition and Metabolism. The research, conducted by kinesiologists from McMaster University and the University of British Columbia (UBC) Okanagan, reveals that ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-01-19
  • Study: Psychological Distress Linked to Future Dementia
    A new Danish study suggests that vital exhaustion as a sign of psychological distress may be a risk factor for future dementia. Danish researchers found that such distress in late midlife is associated with a higher risk of dementia in later life. believe their findings will encourage improved care for ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-01-18
  • Low-Income City Residents Tend to Have Less Access to Greenery
    City residents with higher incomes and education tend to have greater access to trees and greenery compared to their less-privileged neighbors, according to a new study published in the journal Landscape and Urban Planning. Researchers at the University of British Columbia (UBC) looked at census data and highly detailed aerial ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-01-18
  • People with One Mental Disorder Likely to Be Diagnosed with Another
    People who are diagnosed with a major mental disorder are at greater risk of being diagnosed with another, according to a new Danish study published in the journal JAMA Psychiatry. For the first time, researchers looked at the risks of double diagnosis (comorbidity) within ten major groups of mental disorders. ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-01-18
  • Boosting Screening for Perinatal Mood & Anxiety Disorders
    Medical policymakers are increasingly urging aggressive screening and integrated care to help women with perinatal mood and anxiety disorders (PMADs), including postpartum depression. According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, PMADs are the most common complication of childbirth in the U.S., affecting about 14 percent of women in their lifetimes and ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-01-17

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