Psychology News

  • Speech Analysis Software Helps Predict Psychosis in Those at Risk
    Many young people at-risk for psychosis show a disturbance in flow of meaning during speech. In a new study, researchers used a software program to analyze speech transcripts gathered from oral interviews with at-risk young adults. They discovered that the software was able to predict which of these individuals would ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-01-23
  • Health-Ed Programs on Depression Can Help Teens
    A “depression literacy” program for ninth or 10th graders appears to help teenagers speak up and seek adult help for themselves or a peer, suggests a new study. Johns Hopkins University researchers assessed the effectiveness of Adolescent Depression Awareness Programs (ADAP) that provides selected high school teachers a curriculum geared ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-01-23
  • More Than Hour a Day of Screen Time Tied to Teen Unhappiness
    A new study suggests teens whose eyes are habitually glued to their smartphones are markedly unhappier, according to  lead author and San Diego State University professor of psychology Dr. Jean M. Twenge. Twenge, along with colleagues Gabrielle Martin at SDSU and W. Keith Campbell at the University of Georgia, analyzed ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-01-23
  • Exposure to Natural Environment May Lead to Better Body Image
    Exposure to a natural environment, such as a park, appears to significantly enhance positive body image, according to a new multi-university study. A positive body image is one that involves respect for the body and a rejection of rigid ideals around appearance. “There are several reasons why exposure to nature ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-01-22
  • Female Relatives May Be Most Difficult – Because They Care
    Investigators at the University of California, Berkeley, and Bar-Ilan University in Israel found that when it comes to toxic relationships, blood can be thicker than water. Participants surveyed for the study were more apt to report that the most difficult people in their lives were female family members such as ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-01-22
  • Opioid Addiction Linked to Length of First Prescription
    A new study from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) and Harvard Medical School (HMS) sheds light on the link between physicians’ opioid prescription patterns and subsequent abuse. Among surgery patients with no history of recent or chronic opioid use, the researchers demonstrated that duration of treatment is a more ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-01-22
  • Gratitude Can Go A Long Way in The Workplace
    New research contradicts the notion that telling someone they are doing a good job has no place in the dog-eat-dog world of business. Investigators from the Performance Science Institute at the University of Southern California discovered that for businesses, gratitude comes with significant ROI, or return on investment. “Gratitude is ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-01-22
  • Learning & Memory Problems Begin Early in OCD
    A new study has found that adolescents with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) have widespread learning and memory problems. Researchers at the University of Cambridge say their findings have already been used to assist adolescents with OCD obtain the help they needed at school to realize their potential  — including helping one go ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-01-21
  • Occupational Therapy May Aid Quality of Life for Younger Diabetics
    Occupational therapy may significantly improve the health and quality of life of diabetic young people, according to a new study led by researchers at the University of Southern California (USC). The researchers hypothesize that occupational therapy is able to help diabetes patients improve their quality of life through its central ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-01-21
  • Babies’ Babbling Shapes Social Interactions to Aid Language Learning
    New research shows that babies organize their mothers’ verbal responses, which helps them learn language more effectively. The key is infant babbling, according to researchers. It’s known that babies modify their sounds to become more speech-like in response to feedback from their caregivers, and that they learn things have names ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-01-21
  • Americans Are Getting A Little More Sleep
    A new survey published in the journal Sleep finds that, on average, Americans are slowly but surely getting more shut-eye, even if it’s just a few minutes each week. The findings show that, overall, people seem to be turning in a little earlier and spending less time watching TV or ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-01-21
  • For Teens, CBT in Primary Care Can Be Cost-Effective Versus Meds
    Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) delivered in a primary care setting is a cost-effective way to treat adolescents with depression who refuse antidepressants or stop taking their medications, according to a new study. The new study builds upon previous research that found that CBT improved time to diagnostic recovery from major ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-01-20
  • How Working Memory Goes Wrong in Schizophrenia
    In a new study published in the journal Biological Psychiatry, researchers discover that cognitive problems that often plague people with schizophrenia may be due to disruptions in the brain’s visuospatial working memory network. Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh studied the patterns of the neurotransmitters glutamate and GABA in a ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-01-20
  • Mental Health Diagnoses Up Among Teens in Finland
    An increasing number of adolescents have been diagnosed with a psychiatric or neurodevelopmental disorder, according to a national register study comparing Finnish birth cohorts from 1987 with 1997. The largest increase was seen among girls who made special health care visits related to depression and anxiety. The study, conducted by ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-01-20
  • The Key to Willpower: Believe You Have an Unlimited Supply
    PHOTO: http://www.eurekalert.org/multimedia/pub/160813.php Why do some people seem locked in a lifelong battle for self-control while others are so self-disciplined they seem impervious to overeating, overspending, or binge-watching TV shows when they feel pressured? The secret to having ironclad willpower lies in believing you have an unlimited supply of it, says ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-01-20

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