Psychology News

  • Self-Criticism About Weight May Originate With Others
    Some overweight and obese individuals are more likely to engage in “self-stigmatization,” in which they internalize their weight stigma experiences and begin to blame and devalue themselves. In a new study of more than 18,000 adults, researchers from Penn Medicine and the University of Connecticut Rudd Center for Food Policy ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-07-16
  • Early Puberty in Girls Tied to Greater Risk for Migraine
    Adolescent girls who reach puberty at an earlier age may be at greater risk of developing migraine headaches, according to a new study by the University of Cincinnati (UC) College of Medicine. “We know that the percentage of girls and boys who have migraine is pretty much the same until ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-07-15
  • Preterm Babies Less Likely to Have Romantic Relationships in Adulthood
    A new study has found that adults who were born pre-term — under 37 weeks gestation — are less likely to form romantic relationships, have sexual relations, or experience parenthood than those who were born full term. Researchers at the University of Warwick in the UK suggests it’s partly due ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-07-15
  • Exercise May Improve Mood, Anxiety in Older Adults Getting Chemotherapy
    Older chemotherapy patients who engage in low- to moderate-intensity exercise at home may experience improved anxiety, mood and social and emotional well-being, according to a new study published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society (JAGS). Previous research has shown that exercise can improve anxiety and mood issues in ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-07-14
  • Just Seeing Green Space May Ease Cravings for Alcohol, Cigarettes, Junk Food
    A new study shows a link between being able to see green spaces from your home and reduced cravings for alcohol, cigarettes, and harmful foods. The study is the first to demonstrate that passive exposure to nearby green space is linked to both lower frequencies and strengths of cravings, according ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-07-14
  • Study: Mentally Stimulating Activities Lower Risk/Delay Memory Loss
    A new study suggests mentally stimulating activities like using a computer, playing games, crafting and participating in social activities are linked to a lower risk or delay of age-related memory loss. Moreover, the time of life (middle-age and older) and the number of stimulating activities may influence retention of memory ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-07-14
  • School Suspensions Tied to More Offenses Later, Not Less
    A new study finds that, rather than decreasing criminal behavior, school suspensions are linked to an increase in subsequent offending. The research, published in the Justice Quarterly, took a longitudinal look at how school suspensions — which affect around 3.5 million American students a year — are related to offending ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-07-14
  • Imagination May Be Key to Altruistic Behavior
    New research shows that when we see people in trouble, we imagine how we can help before we act. According to researchers at Boston College and the University of Albany, SUNY, the underlying process at work is referred to as episodic simulation, essentially the ability to re-organize memories from the ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-07-13
  • Why Sex Becomes Less Satisfying as Women Age
    A new study has identified several psychosocial contributors to why women have less sex as they age. Previous research has focused largely on biological causes, such as hot flashes, sleep disruption, vaginal dryness and painful intercourse. The new study looks at the effects of  psychosocial changes that are common post-menopause, ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-07-13
  • LGBTQ Asian-Americans Seen as More ‘American’
    Asian Americans are the fastest-growing racial group in the United States but one that is consistently perceived as “foreign” by other Americans. Now a new study from the University of Washington finds that the sexual orientation of Asian Americans may affect others’ perceptions of their cultural integration. In fact,the findings ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-07-12
  • Combat Veterans at Increased Risk of Mental Health Concerns
    New research suggests military veterans exposed to combat have an increased risk of developing depression and anxiety in later life than veterans who had not seen combat. Oregon State University investigators explain that before the new study, the role of combat exposure on aging and in particular on the ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-07-12
  • Drinking Coffee May Help Activate the Body’s Fat-Fighting Defenses
    Coffee lovers everywhere can rejoice once again, as scientists may have found yet another reason to continue enjoying a morning cup of joe. A new U.K. study suggests that drinking caffeinated coffee can help stimulate “brown fat,” the body’s own fat-fighting defenses which help regulate how quickly we burn calories ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-07-12
  • Study: Midlife Sleep Problems May Up Risk of Alzheimer’s
    A new study suggests that people who report a declining quality of sleep as they age from their 50s to their 60s have a higher risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease later in life. The study appears online in the Journal of Neuroscience. Psychologists at the University of California, Berkeley discovered ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-07-12
  • Bystanders Will Intervene to Help Victims of Aggression and Violence
    A new study finds that bystanders will intervene in nine out of 10 public fights to help victims of aggression and violence. The findings, from the study of real-life conflicts captured by CCTV, overturn the idea that we live in a “walk-on-by society” where victims are ignored by bystanders. A ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-07-12
  • Some Schizophrenia Brains Show Abnormal Protein Buildup Similar to Alzheimer’s
    In a new study, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers unveiled new evidence showing that some schizophrenia brains are marked by a buildup of abnormal proteins similar to those found in the brains of people with neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s or Huntington’s diseases. The findings, published in the American Journal of ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-07-12

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