Psychology News

  • Blue Light from Digital Devices Can Reduce Sleep Quality
    Hoping to get a good night’s sleep? You might want to grab a book instead of your smartphone when you get into bed tonight. A new study by researchers at the University of Houston (UH) College of Optometry finds that the blue light emitted from digital devices decreases sleep quality ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-07-29
  • Is it Alzheimer’s Disease or Frontotemporal Dementia?
    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), a noninvasive technique that uses magnetic fields to stimulate nerve cells, may help physicians differentiate between frontotemporal dementia and Alzheimer’s disease, according to a new study. These two different types of dementia have similar symptoms. Once believed to be a rare condition, frontotemporal dementia is now estimated to ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-07-28
  • Study Finds Smallest Preemies Not at More Risk of Adult Mental Health Issues
    A population health study of very preterm and very-low-birth-weight individuals finds that these early births are not associated with anxiety and mood disorders later in life. The finding challenges earlier research that suggested increased risks. The study will appear in an upcoming issue of the Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry. ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-07-28
  • Third-Person Self-Talk Can Support Emotional Control
    New research confirms the value of silently talking to yourself in the third person, especially during stressful times. The first-of-its-kind study discovered third person narrative self-talk helps one their control emotions, and relatively effortlessly. That is, the third-person self-talk does not require any additional effort than what one would use ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-07-28
  • Men Can Have Work-Family Conflicts Similar to Women
    In a new study, University of Georgia researchers find women and men report similar levels of work-family conflicts, both in the form of work interfering with family and family interfering with work. Investigators spent several years examining the findings from more than 350 studies conducted over three decades that included ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-07-28
  • Brain Stimulation Aids Cognitive Performance in Schizophrenia
    Emerging research suggests brain stimulation could be used to treat cognitive deficits frequently associated with schizophrenia. Investigators from King’s College London explain that current interventions are ineffective for the deficits which can impact short-term memory and decision making, and lead to severe impairments in people with schizophrenia. The cognitive ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-07-27
  • Bipolar Associated with Faster Aging
    New research suggests that people with a family history of bipolar disorder may ‘age’ more rapidly than those without a history of the disease. However, a common treatment for the disorder may conceal or even reverse the detrimental cellular effects. Investigators from King’s College London research discovered that bipolar ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-07-27
  • Explaining the Science of ADHD to Kids
    Scientists at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) in Japan recently published their research on attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in Frontiers for Young Minds, an electronic scientific journal whose primary audience includes children from elementary and junior high schools. In this unique journal, children are involved in ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-07-27
  • Diet Rich in Lutein May Keep You Sharp
    New research suggest higher levels of lutein — a nutrient found in green leafy vegetables such as spinach and kale, as well as avocados and eggs — may provide cognitive benefits. University of Illinois investigators explain that spinach and kale are often a mainstay of those looking to stay physically ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-07-27
  • Diet Linked to Cognitive Abilities in Older Adults
    A new study suggests a Mediterranean-style diet may lower the risk for memory difficulties in older adults. Researchers discovered eating foods found in two healthy diets –- the Mediterranean or the MIND diet — were linked to improved performance on cognitive tests when compared to people who consumed less healthy ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-07-26
  • Brain Activity Test Can Detect Autism Severity
    New research suggests a brain activity test that measures the frequency of certain brain waves can help to distinguish the wide range of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Initially, UCLA investigators discovered that children with autism have a tell-tale difference on brain tests compared with other children. Then the researchers ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-07-26
  • Mindfulness, Hypnosis Can Quickly Ease Acute Pain in Hospital Patients
    Mindfulness training and hypnotic suggestion may drastically reduce severe pain in hospital patients, according to new research published in the Journal of General Internal Medicine. The University of Utah study is the first to investigate the effects of mindfulness and hypnosis on acute pain in the hospital setting. After receiving ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-07-26
  • Cognitive Cross-Training for Brain Health
    New research finds that just as cross-training helps improve strength, flexibility and endurance, stimulating the brain in a variety of formats may aid learning. University of Illinois researchers performed an 18-week study of 318 healthy young adults and found a combination of stimuli promoted skill learning significantly more than using ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-07-26
  • Unstable Childhood May Hike Risk of Adult Obesity
    Researchers have discovered that an unpredictable childhood appears to be linked to a much higher risk of adult obesity. In a new study, Florida State University investigators discovered childhood experiences of parental divorce, exposure to crime, or frequent moves were associated with higher risk of becoming obese as an adult. ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-07-25
  • Online Speech Therapy Can Be as Effective as In-Person Treatment
    Rehabilitation services delivered over the Internet and through other telecommunication networks allow health care professionals to reach more patients in need, but there has been some concern that so-called telerehabilitation doesn’t offer the same quality of care as in-person treatment. Now a new study by Canadian researchers at Baycrest Centre ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-07-25

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