Psychology News

  • Obesity Alone May Not Increase Risk of Death
    Obesity alone, without any other metabolic risk factors, is not linked to an increased risk of death, according to a new Canadian study at York University. Obesity is often tied to a number of health problems, including high blood pressure, abnormal cholesterol and high blood sugar. These, in turn, can ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-07-16
  • Study Finds Athletes with ADHD Have Greater Risk of Anxiety, Depression After Concussion
    Athletes who have attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may be at greater risk for experiencing persistent anxiety and depression after a concussion, according to new research. “These findings suggest that ADHD and concussion may have a cumulative effect on anxiety and depression beyond that of either ADHD or concussion alone,” said ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-07-15
  • Support from Female Co-Workers Can Empower Moms to Breastfeed
    Emotional support from female co-workers plays a major role in whether or not new moms choose to keep breastfeeding after returning to work, according to a new study by researchers at Michigan State University (MSU) and Texas Christian University (TCU). The study is the first to focus specifically on the ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-07-15
  • Scars of Partner Violence Can Hinder New Relationships
    The damaging effects of intimate partner violence (IPV) often continue long after the abusive relationship is over, yet few resources exist to help victims move on to form new, healthy relationships, according to a new study published in the Journal of Interpersonal Violence. “Once a victim leaves an abusive relationship, ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-07-15
  • Heading Soccer Ball May Lead to Balance Issues
    Soccer players who frequently head the ball may be more likely to experience short-term balance problems, suggesting that repetitive head impacts could potentially lead to subtle neurological deficits not previously recognized, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Delaware (UD). Further research is needed to study ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-07-15
  • Brain Scan Plus Learning Data May Help ID Psychosis Risk
    In a recent study, investigators from the University of Missouri discovered that brain scans, coupled with behavioral data, could provide markers for diagnosing psychosis risk. Moreover, the researchers discovered that improving how well people at risk for psychosis learn from positive and negative feedback could potentially help mitigate psychotic symptoms. ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-07-14
  • LGBQ Teens May Be More Likely to Use Dangerous Drugs
    Lesbian, gay, bisexual, or questioning (LGBQ) teens are at substantially higher risk of substance use than their heterosexual peers, according to a new study. As part of the most recent National Youth Risk Behavior Survey, 15,624 high school students were asked about their use of 15 substances, including alcohol, drugs, ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-07-14
  • Prison Employees Face High Rates of PTSD
    Prison workers experience post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) at the same rate as Iraq and Afghanistan war veterans, according to a new study at Washington State University (WSU). The findings, published in the American Journal of Industrial Medicine, show that prison workers experience almost constant threat to their personal safety while ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-07-14
  • The Most Conservative Voters Appear Most Likely to Use Adultery Dating Site
    A new study shows that political conservatives are more likely than liberals to use an adultery dating website. According to an analysis of leaked user data from Ashley Madison, a website that connects married people who want to cheat on their partner, Democrats, who generally have a more liberal take ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-07-14
  • Even Short Bouts of Exercise Can Hike Brain Connectivity, Efficiency
    If you want to learn a new motor skill, a new study suggests it’s a good idea to go for a short run after each practice session. The study, published in NeuroImage, demonstrates that exercise performed immediately after practicing a new motor skill improves its long-term retention. More specifically, the ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-07-14
  • Machine Learning May Help Diagnose, Treat Schizophrenia Patients
    Through the use of machine learning, psychiatric researchers can apply analysis techniques to large amounts of data. This gives scientists the unprecedented opportunity to categorize and compare complex brain patterns, genes and behaviors to gain major insights into the nature of a specific mental illness. A new Canadian study brings ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-07-13
  • Smartphone Exercise Game Shows Promise for Sedentary Office Workers
    A sedentary lifestyle can increase one’s risk for a variety of mental and physical health problems, including depression, obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Unfortunately, this is the way of life for a majority of Americans. So, how do you motivate people to become active? Researchers at the University of Iowa ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-07-13
  • Study Finds Disrupted Stress Response in Schizophrenia Patients
    A new Canadian study published in the journal Brain shows that stress tends to impact the brain and body differently in schizophrenia patients than in healthy people or even in those at high risk for developing psychosis. Specifically, the researchers found that the association between two chemicals released when people ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-07-12
  • Does Insecurity Drive Men to Sexual Harassment?
    New research suggests that sexual harassment is related to feeling threatened and wanting to maintain one’s social status. Thus the high-profile men who have recently been accused of sexual harassment may not have been simply exercising their power. Instead their behavior could be related to feeling insecure and believing that ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-07-12
  • Could Mental Health Apps Lead to Overdiagnosis?
    In a new Australian study, researchers at the University of Sydney aimed to find out how popular mental health apps tend to portray mental health and what the apps offer in terms of diagnosis and management. The research team evaluated the advertising materials of 61 popular mental health apps available ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-07-11

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