Psychology News

  • Autistic Teens Prone to Depressive Symptoms – Especially if Bullied
    Researchers have discovered that teenagers with difficulties in social communication, including autism, have higher rates of depressive symptoms, especially if they are being bullied. Investigators from the University of Bristol used questionnaires along with clinical and genetic information to study 6,091 young people from the Children of the 90s longitudinal ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-06-20
  • Why Being Left-Handed May Affect Brain-Based Treatments
    Mental health treatments that involve electrical or magnetic stimulation to the brain could be ineffective or even harmful to psychiatric patients who are not strongly right-handed, according to a new model of human emotion demonstrated by researcher Dr. Daniel Casasanto from Cornell University. The study is published in the journal ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-06-20
  • Strong Sibling Bond May Buffer Effects of Parental Conflict
    Children who regularly witness hostile arguments between their parents are at greater risk for developing mental health problems. However, many who grow up in conflict-ridden homes never go on to develop any psychological issues. In a new study, researchers wanted to know why some children appear to be protected from ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-06-20
  • Fasting Morning & Night Can Aid Weight Loss
    A new approach to losing weight that allows people to eat what they want, and the quantity they want — although only for a set number of hours a day — has been found to reduce weight and lower blood pressure. Moreover, the diet may be easier to maintain. Investigators say the ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-06-19
  • ‘Helicopter Parenting’ May Hinder How Kids Manage Emotions, Behavior
    A new study shows that over-controlling parenting, or “helicopter parenting,” can harm a child’s ability to manage his or her emotions and behavior. The findings, published in the journal Developmental Psychology, assert that children need space to learn and grow on their own, without Mom or Dad hovering over them. ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-06-19
  • Study: No Link Between Cannabis And Suicidal Behavior for Most Psychiatric Patients
    A new Canadian study finds no notable link between cannabis use and suicidal behavior in most people with psychiatric disorders. The findings, published in the journal Biology of Sex Differences, contrast with previous data suggesting that the drug is associated with an increased risk of suicidal behavior in the general ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-06-18
  • Urban Violence Creates Ripple Effects in Schools
    Research shows that children living in violent neighborhoods experience trauma that makes them more difficult to teach. These students are more likely to get lower test scores, drop out of high school and develop depression, attention problems and/or discipline problems. Now a new study at Johns Hopkins University finds that ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-06-18
  • Gout Linked to Higher Risk of Dementia
    A new study finds that gout is associated with a 17 to 20 percent higher risk of dementia in the elderly. A common condition, gout is caused by deposits of crystals of uric acid (also known as urate) in the joints, which leads to inflammation. Symptom flares can be unpredictable ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-06-17
  • Middle-Aged Female Early Risers May Have Less Risk of Depression
    Middle-aged and older women who are naturally early to bed and early to rise may be less likely to develop depression, according to a new study published in the Journal of Psychiatric Research. Researchers at the University of Colorado (CU) Boulder and the Channing Division of Network Medicine at Brigham ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-06-17
  • Impostor Syndrome Seems to Affects Men and Women Differently
    A new study has found that men and women with impostor syndrome cope with accountability and react to negative feedback in different ways. If men who see themselves as impostors receive negative feedback and are held accountable for their performance by their superiors, they tend to react more negatively. Women ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-06-17
  • Brain Matures Faster With Early Childhood Stress 
    A new study has discovered that stress in early childhood leads to faster maturation of certain brain regions during adolescence. In contrast, stress experienced later in life leads to slower maturation of the adolescent brain, according to a long-term study conducted by researchers at Radboud University in the Netherlands. For ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-06-16
  • Mindfulness May Ease Pain of Social Rejection
    Mindfulness can help ease the pain of social rejection, according to a new study published in the journal Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience. Mindfulness is the ability to focus on the present moment while calmly acknowledging and accepting one’s feelings and thoughts. “Social rejection can have a number of negative ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-06-16
  • Depression, Anxiety Track Disease Activity in Early Arthritis
    Rates of anxiety and depression in patients with rheumatoid arthritis correlate with measures of the disease’s activity over the first year following diagnosis, according to new research. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease that affects a person’s joints, causing pain and disability. RA is more common in older ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-06-16
  • High Blood Pressure May Pose Greater Risk for Dementia
    People with high blood pressure face a greater risk of developing dementia, according to a new study in published in the journal Cardiovascular Research. The study is also the first to show how new uses of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can detect very early signs of neurological damage in people ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-06-16
  • EEG May Predict Effectiveness of Either Talk Therapy or Antidepressants
    Research has shown that when we experience a positive event in our lives, our brains respond with an increase in electrical activity — a reaction known as “reward positivity.” People who suffer from depression, however, tend to show reduced brain activity in response to good things happening in their lives. ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-06-15

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