Psychology News

  • Aging Research May Hold Key to New Alzheimer’s Treatments
    A full review of Alzheimer’s drug research, including current agents being studied for the prevention and treatment of the disease (and other dementias), emphasizes the need to develop and test drugs based on an understanding of the multiple effects of aging on the brain. “Alzheimer’s is a complex disease with ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-12-10
  • Brain Alterations May Help Explain Why Some Kids are More Resilient
    A new study sheds light on the mystery of why some children are more vulnerable to the effects of maltreatment — a major risk factor for psychiatric complications including anxiety, depression, addiction and suicide — and others seem more resilient. Researchers at McLean Hospital of Harvard Medical School found that while many ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-12-10
  • New Drug Shown to Ease Pot Withdrawal, Lessen Use
    A new drug can help people diagnosed with cannabis use disorder reduce withdrawal symptoms and marijuana use, according to a new study. According to recent national data, approximately one-third of all current cannabis users meet the diagnostic criteria for cannabis use disorder. The double-blind, placebo-controlled study shows marijuana use declined ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-12-09
  • Narcissists May Be Less Likely to Support Democracy
    A new study suggests that narcissistic people are less likely to support democracy. They are also more likely to feel that democracies are not good in maintaining order, or that it would be better if countries were run by strong leaders or the military, say researchers from the University of ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-12-09
  • Infections In Childhood Linked to Increased Risk of Mental Disorders
    A new study shows that fevers, sore throats and infections during childhood can increase the risk of also suffering from a mental disorder as a child or adolescent. According to researchers, the study’s findings expand the understanding of the role of the immune system in the development of mental disorders.  ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-12-08
  • Nursing Home Quality May Suffer When Economy is Good
    Quality of care in U.S. nursing homes is more likely to improve during periods of high unemployment and worsen when the economy is good, according to a new study by researchers at Georgetown University Medical Center (GUMC) in Washington, D.C. The reason is likely tied to how the strength of ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-12-08
  • Study: Masculine Faces Are Seen as More Competent
    People tend to view masculine faces as more competent, according to a new study published in the journal Psychological Science. This correlation is also true for female faces, but only to a certain point, after which more masculine female faces are perceived as less competent. “Our research sheds light on ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-12-08
  • Very Shy People More Likely to Have Anxiety During a Hangover
    Very shy people are more likely to experience “hangxiety” — anxiety during a hangover — compared to their more extroverted peers, according to a new U.K. study conducted by researchers from the University of Exeter and University College London (UCL). “We know that many people drink to ease anxiety felt ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-12-07
  • Drawing Is Better Than Writing for Memorizing Information
    Older adults who take up drawing — even when they’re not very good at it — can help boost their memory, according to a new Canadian study published in the journal Experimental Aging and Research. The findings show that drawing as a method to help retain new information is more ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-12-07
  • Fetal Malnutrition Linked to Early Menopause, Ovarian Failure
    Insufficient nutrition during fetal development may be linked to early menopause and premature ovarian failure, according to a new large-scale study of Chinese women born during the Great Chinese Famine, between 1956 and 1964. Although several studies have looked at the association between famine exposure in early life and the ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-12-06
  • Vitamin D Deficiency May Up Risk of Depression for Older Adults
    A new study by researchers from The Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing (TILDA) at Trinity College Dublin suggests that a deficiency in vitamin D is associated with a substantial increased risk of depression over a four-year follow-up period. It is well-recognized that later life depression can significantly reduce quality of ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-12-06
  • Less Strife Seen in Longer Marriages as Partners Mellow
    In a new study, researchers discovered the squabbling and acrimony between couples in the early and middle years of a marriage decline with age as conflicts give way to humor and acceptance. For the study, University of California, Berkeley, investigators analyzed videotaped conversations between 87 middle-aged and older husbands and ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-12-05
  • How Real-World Learning Experiences Can Help Kids Retain Knowledge
    A new study finds that real-world learning experiences, such as an animal-focused summer camp, can significantly improve children’s knowledge in just a few days. Significantly, this type of real-world learning offers more than just an increase in factual knowledge, say the researchers. It improves how children organize what they know, ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-12-05
  • Some Victims of Bad Bosses Strive to Become Exceptional Leaders
    When offered leadership opportunities, those who have been victims of abusive bosses are more likely to treat their own employees better by learning what not to do, according to a new study published in the Journal of Applied Psychology. The findings show that workers who relied on their morals and ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-12-05
  • Better Sleep Can Improve College Academic Performance on Finals
    As the college semester nears the end, an innovative experiment has shown the benefits of averaging eight hours of sleep for five nights during final exams week. The study suggests that instead of pulling an all-nighter to cram for a final exam, students are better served by improving their sleep ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-12-04

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