Psychology News

  • Study: Standard Test for Autism Needs Work
    In a new review, researchers discovered that a test widely used to diagnose autism in  children is less reliable than previously assumed. Using a novel study method, investigators from Rutgers University digitized the standardized test known as the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS), to improve reliability when recording observations of ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-01-28
  • ‘Macho’ Identity Linked to More Severe PTSD in Vets
    Military training includes learning to suppress emotion and the development of self-reliance. These skills are believed to help service members perform better in the field. New research suggests that when veterans return home, strict adherence to these traits can become detrimental, leading to more severe post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms that ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-01-28
  • Middle School Can Be Highly Stressful, And Not Just For Students
    Middle school is notorious for being one of the most stressful periods in a young person’s life. Now, a new study finds that middle school is not just stressful for students, but it is extremely taxing for teachers as well. In fact, the findings show that 94% of middle school ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-01-28
  • 9 Out of 10 Parents Say Teens Spend Too Much Time Video Gaming
    A new poll finds that nearly 90 percent of parents believe their teen spends too much time gaming. However, the poll also suggests many parents may be mistaken about the extent of their child’s video game habits. University of Michigan researchers say the C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital National Poll discovered ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-01-27
  • Facial Paralysis Takes Emotional Toll, Especially When Acquired Later in Life
    Individuals with facial paralysis are more likely to experience depression and anxiety compared to the general population, especially if the paralysis occurs later in life rather than at birth, according to a new study published in the journal Health Psychology. Approximately 225,000 people each year develop facial paralysis in the ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-01-26
  • Reducing Weight And Stigma Can Be Complementary Goals
    The social stigma of being overweight is often internalized by people with obesity, causing them to blame and devalue themselves because of their weight. While it’s known that weight “self-stigma” is linked to poor mental and physical health, little is known about how to help people overcome it. In a ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-01-26
  • Air Pollution at Birth Can Change How Brain Develops
    A new study finds a link between significant early childhood exposure to traffic-related air pollution (TRAP) and structural changes in the brain at the age of 12. According to researchers at the Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, children with higher levels of TRAP exposure at birth had reductions at age ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-01-26
  • Living Near Major Roads And Their Polluted Air Tied to Parkinson’s, Dementia
    People living near major roads or highways may be at greater risk of developing neurological disorders, such as dementia or Parkinson’s disease, but green spaces may help reduce this risk, according to a new Canadian study published in the journal Environmental Health. A research team from the University of British ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-01-26
  • Mouse Study: Soybean Oil May Disrupt Metabolism, Oxytocin
    A new mouse study reveals that soybean oil has a pronounced effect on the hypothalamus, a region of the brain involved in metabolism, reproduction and stress response, and may even affect neurological conditions like autism, Alzheimer’s disease, anxiety, and depression. Commonly used for fast food frying, livestock feed and packaged ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-01-26
  • Growth Hormone Therapy Can Ease Symptoms in Brain Injury Patients
    More than 2.5 million people in the United States experience a traumatic brain injury, or TBI, each year. Many deal with health issues for years after their head injury, such as fatigue, depression, anxiety, memory issues and sleep disturbances. Now, a new study has found that TBI triggers a reduction ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-01-25
  • Hot Flashes Can Hinder Verbal Memory
    A new study shows that if you are having difficulty finding the right word to express yourself clearly or can’t remember a story correctly, you can blame the hot flashes associated with menopause. The new research shows that physiologic hot flashes are associated with decreased verbal memory and with alterations ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-01-25
  • The Allure of Horror Movies
    Why are we drawn to horror movies? Humans are fascinated by what scares us, be it skydiving, roller coasters, or true-crime documentaries — provided these threats are kept at a safe distance. Horror movies are no different, according to researchers at the University of Turku in Finland. To study why ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-01-25
  • Maternal Stress May Harm Babies’ Brains
    New research has found that severe maternal stress, anxiety and depression may be associated with impairment in key fetal brain regions before birth. Researchers from the Children’s National Hospital discovered the link in women who knew their unborn fetus has a congenital heart disease. While additional research is needed, the ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-01-24
  • Mix of Air Pollution and Stress Tied to Cognitive Problems in Kids
    Children exposed to air pollution in the womb and who subsequently experience heightened levels of stress in early life show greater symptoms of attention and thought problems, according to a new study at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health and Columbia Psychiatry. “Prenatal exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, a ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-01-24
  • Brain Imaging May Improve Outcomes for Those With Mental Disorders
    Brain imaging may one day lead to better diagnoses and treatments for those struggling with mental health disorders, including depression and anxiety, according to a new study from the University of Pennsylvania. When diagnosing mental health disorders, clinicians currently rely heavily on the patient’s symptoms, which can be an entirely ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-01-24

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