Psychology News

  • Memory Shifts Into High Gear When We Think About Our Children
    A new study has found that human memory has evolved so that we better recall events encountered when we are thinking about our children. “Our ability to think and memorize information arises from our nervous systems,” said Binghamton University Distinguished Professor of Psychology Ralph Miller. “As our nervous systems are ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-12-16
  • Bosses Who Can’t Put Down Smartphone Risk Losing Employees’ Trust
    Supervisors who can’t tear themselves away from their smartphones while meeting with employees risk losing their employees’ trust and, ultimately, their engagement, according to new research. The new study from researchers at Baylor University’s Hankamer School of Business examines “boss phubbing” — boss phone snubbing — which the researchers define ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-12-16
  • Social Workers Lack Tools to Identify Cases of Chronic Neglect
    More than 75 percent of all child protection cases in the US are due to neglect, and yet despite this alarming frequency, a new study finds that child welfare workers lack the tools necessary to identify cases of chronic neglect. The findings, which add critical new insights to the understudied ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-12-16
  • Coloring Books Relieve Some Stress, But Real Art Therapy Boosts Mood, Creativity
    A new study shows that although the extremely popular adult coloring books can reduce stress, they are not nearly as effective for mental health as engaging in true art therapy. The findings show that participants who created their own art in a therapist-assisted open studio experienced heightened creativity, more positive ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-12-16
  • Controversy Over Children’s Screen-Time Recommendations
    A new UK research study from Oxford University suggests American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommended screen-time limits on children aged two to five are too restrictive. The AAP proposes a limit of one to two hours per day, as good for the psychological-wellbeing of young children. The new findings are ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-12-15
  • Family Meals Help Children Physically and Mentally
    A new Canadian study investigated the long-held belief that when children and parents dine together, the child benefits. Although this presumption has been implied, the new study confirms that children who routinely eat their meals together with their family are more likely to experience long-term physical and mental health benefits. ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-12-15
  • Healthy Eating Tied to Greater Wellbeing in Children
    Regardless of body weight, children who eat healthy diets are more likely to have higher self-esteem and fewer emotional and peer problems, such as having fewer friends or being picked on or bullied, according to new research published in the open access journal BMC Public Health. “We found that in ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-12-15
  • Journaling Appears to Improve Altruism
    Technology in the form of brain imaging allow researchers to objectively evaluate how our actions affect the brain. A remarkable new imaging study suggests that the regular noting of feelings of gratitude in a journal, leads to increased altruism. University of Oregon researchers say the study is one of ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-12-15
  • High-Altitude Psychosis Seen as Distinct from Altitude Sickness
    In a new study of psychotic episodes at extreme altitudes, researchers have determined that high-altitude psychosis is a stand-alone medical illness, rather than a condition stemming from acute altitude sickness as had been previously believed. High-altitude psychosis is a fairly well-known illness and is frequently mentioned in mountain literature. For ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-12-14
  • Can Air Pollution Influence Teen Behavior?
    A profound new study links higher levels of air pollution to increased teenage delinquency. Researchers from University of Southern California’s (USC) Keck School of Medicine believe the association is a reminder of the importance of clean air and the need for more foliage in urban spaces. Tiny pollution particles called ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-12-14
  • Father’s Rejection Can Lead to Teen Anxiety
    In a new study, Pennsylvania State University investigators discovered rejection from fathers during adolescence may lead to increases in social anxiety and loneliness among teens. The paper appears in the Journal of Youth and Adolescence. Investigators examined how parental rejection, as well as the overall well-being of the family unit, ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-12-14
  • Apprehension Over Loss of Control May Fuel Anxiety Disorders
    Do you know someone who when leaving their house, always goes back to check to ensure they turned off the gas or propane heaters? Or, do you double check that the front door is locked? Are you sure? If this sounds familiar, perhaps you can relate to people with obsessive-compulsive ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-12-14
  • New Therapy Technique Improves Social Skills among Those with Schizophrenia
    UK researchers announce the success of a new therapy for young people suffering from schizophrenia. The technique, Social Recovery Therapy, helps individuals reconnect and engage with the world around them. University of Sussex investigators explain that Social Recovery Therapy helps severely withdrawn individuals to identify personally meaningful goals and to ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-12-13
  • Many MDs Reluctant to Prescribe Cannabis for Kids with Cancer
    Doctors who care for pediatric cancer patients receive frequent requests for medical marijuana to help relieve children’s pain, nausea, lack of appetite, depression, and anxiety. But how often is cannabis actually prescribed in these cases? In a new study based on survey responses from 288 interdisciplinary providers in Illinois, Massachusetts, ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-12-13
  • Action Video Games May Improve Cognitive Skills
    A new international research effort declares that action video games influence cognitive abilities such as perception, attention, and reaction time. The finding stems from an analysis of over 15 years of data accumulated by a team of psychologists, led by the University of Geneva (UNIGE), Switzerland. Experts explain that the ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-12-13

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