Psychology News

  • Nitrous Oxide for PTSD?
    A new pilot study gives an early glimpse into how veterans who are struggling with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) may benefit from one simple, inexpensive treatment involving nitrous oxide, commonly known as laughing gas. For military veterans with PTSD, symptoms such as anxiety, anger and depression can have a devastating ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-07-13
  • Early Compliance With Social Distancing May Show Working Memory Abilities
    A new study suggests that people who engaged in social distancing during the early stages of COVID-19 may have stronger working memories. Working memory is the mental process of holding information in the mind for a brief period of time; typically, just seconds. The amount of information working memory can ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-07-13
  • Lifestyle Choices, Social Connections May Impact COVID-19 Susceptibility
    New research suggests lifestyle choices coupled with the emotional stress of social isolation and interpersonal conflicts may increase the risk for contracting COVID-19. Investigators explain that lifestyle refers to practices such as smoking, exercise and other behaviors generally associated with risk factors for certain cancers and cardiovascular disease. A growing ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-07-12
  • Biomarker for Cardiovascular Illness May Also Signal Dementia
    A new study suggests that an easily measurable marker of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular risk may also be an early warning sign of cognitive decline in older adults — and potentially dementia. For the study, a research team from Flinders University in Australia and the University of Aberdeen in the U.K. ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-07-12
  • Study: For Long-Term Well-Being, Turn to Power of Realistic Thinking
    Emerging research in the journal Personality & Social Psychology Bulletin suggests realistic thinking is a more effective strategy than forced positive thinking for obtainment of long-term happiness. In a new study, researchers from the University of Bath and London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) studied people’s financial expectations ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-07-12
  • Sharing On Social Media May Hinder Assessing Accuracy of News
    A new study finds that our itch to share on social media helps spread misinformation about the COVID-19 pandemic. The study discovered that when people are consuming news on social media, their inclination to share that news with others interferes with their ability to assess its accuracy. However, there’s good ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-07-11
  • Probiotics May Help Ease Depression
    A new review suggests that probiotics, either taken by themselves or when combined with prebiotics, may help ease depression. While the underlying mechanism remains unclear, probiotics may help reduce the production of inflammatory chemicals, such as cytokines, as is the case in inflammatory bowel disease, say the researchers. Or they ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-07-11
  • Does Our Fave Music When We Were Young Define Us Forever?
    A new U.K. study finds that the music we listened to between the ages of 10 and 30 defines us for the rest of our lives. Researchers at the University of Westminster and City University of London in England say music from this period of our lives — which they ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-07-11
  • Prison, Police Discrimination May Contribute to HIV, Depression Among Gay Black Men
    A new study led by Rutgers University researchers suggests that incarceration and police discrimination may contribute to HIV, depression and anxiety among Black men who are gay, bisexual or other sexual minorities. For the study, the research team looked at the links between incarceration, police and law enforcement discrimination and ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-07-10
  • Prospective Teachers More Likely to Misperceive Black Children as Angry
    A new study suggests that prospective teachers may be more likely to misperceive Black children as angry compared to white children, which may undermine the education of Black youth. The findings are published online in Emotion, an American Psychological Association (APA) journal. While previous work has shown this effect in ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-07-10
  • Light Drinking May Help Older Adults’ Cognition
    A new study suggests light to moderate drinking of alcohol may preserve brain function in older age. The finding is the latest volley over the benefits or detriments of imbibing. Much of the controversy surrounds research methods as most are observational studies involving various age groups. In the current longitudinal ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-07-10
  • Teens May Be Kinder Than We Think
    A new Canadian study seeks to flip the script on the common stereotype that teens are likely to be mean-spirited. The teen years can carry a negative reputation, often depicted in mainstream media, as perpetrators of bullying, cyber harassment or schoolyard battles, say the researchers. The new study focused on ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-07-09
  • Brain Imaging Shows Shared Patterns in Major Mental Disorders
    In a new analysis, a German research team looked at data from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies and discovered that four different neuropsychiatric conditions — major depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) — share brain structural abnormalities. They also found brain signatures that were unique to these individual ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-07-09
  • Closer Threats May Trigger More Primitive Fear in the Brain
    If a perceived threat feels far away, people tend to engage the more problem-solving areas of the brain. But if the threat feels urgent and up-close, animal instincts take over, allowing very little logical reasoning to occur, according to a new virtual reality (VR) study published in the Proceedings of ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-07-08
  • Too Much Sun to Head, Heat Stress Said to Affect Cognition
    A new Danish-led study reveals the harmful cognitive effects of prolonged sunlight exposure to the head. The findings, published in the journal Scientific Reports, suggest that people working or engaging in daily activities outside should take precaution to protect their head against sunlight. “The novelty of the study is that ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-07-08

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