Psychology News

  • The 7 Types of Sugar Daddy Relationships
    Contrary to popular belief, being a sugar daddy isn’t a one-size-fits-all gig. According to a new study, published in the journal Sociological Perspectives, there are seven types of these “sugar” relationships: sugar prostitution, compensated dating, compensated companionship, sugar dating, sugar friendships, sugar friendships with benefits and pragmatic love. “Whenever I ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-10-22
  • Intrusive Police Stops of Youth Can Lead to Traumatic Stress, Stigma
    New research, published in the Journal of Adolescent Health, finds that young people who have been subjected to intrusive police stops are at risk of heightened emotional distress. According to the study, intrusive stops were defined by frisking, harsh language, searches, racial slurs, threat of force and use of force. ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-10-21
  • Poor Health in Pregnancy Tied to Infant Sleep Problems
    Some infant sleep problems may have more to do with the mother’s well-being during pregnancy than with parenting style, according to a new study by the Murdoch Children’s Research Institute in Australia. The findings, published in the Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics, show that infants whose mothers struggled with ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-10-21
  • Does Yo-Yo Dieting Drive Compulsive Eating?
    New research on rats seems to find a connection between yo-yo dieting and compulsive eating. According to researchers at the Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM), a chronic cyclic pattern of overeating followed by undereating reduces the brain’s ability to feel reward and may drive compulsive eating. The finding suggests ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-10-21
  • Osteoarthritis May Play a Role in Social Isolation
    When older adults become socially isolated, their health and well-being can suffer. Now a new study suggests a link between being socially isolated and osteoarthritis (arthritis), a condition that causes joint pain and can limit a person’s ability to get around. The findings are published in the Journal of the ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-10-20
  • Hope Can Aid in Recovery from Anxiety Disorders
    New research suggests hope is a trait that can predict resilience and recovery from anxiety disorders. In a new study, clinical psychologist Dr. Matthew Gallager and colleagues examined the role of hope in predicting recovery in a clinical trial of adults in cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) for common anxiety disorders. ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-10-20
  • Excessive Brain Activity Linked to Shorter Life Span
    Video: New research links excess neural activity — the flickering light seen in this image — to reduced longevity. Credit: Yankner lab, Harvard Medical School. The brain’s neural activity — long implicated in disorders ranging from dementia to epilepsy — also plays a role in how long we ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-10-20
  • Exercise Can Now Be Prescribed Like Medicine for Cancer Patients
    It is well known that regular exercise can help prevent and treat many forms of heart disease, but less commonly known are the benefits of physical activity for cancer patients. A new initiative called Moving Through Cancer — led by Dr. Kathryn Schmitz, professor of public health sciences at Penn ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-10-19
  • Physical Activity During Lessons Can Boost Learning
    Students who take part in physical exercises like running in place during school lessons do better in tests than students who stick to sedentary learning. A meta-analysis of 42 studies around the world conducted by researchers at the University College London, Leiden University, the National University of Singapore, and the ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-10-19
  • Emotional Eating After Bad Breakup May Not Lead to Weight Gain
    Going for that pint of ice cream after a bad breakup may not do as much damage as you think. A new study shows that despite the emotional turmoil, people on average do not report gaining weight after a breakup. The study, which included researchers from Penn State, investigated the ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-10-19
  • Extended Hormone Therapy During Menopause Aids Cognition
    Emerging research suggests a longer period of estrogen replacement therapy provides a prolonged cognitive benefit. However, investigators acknowledge that the risk-to-benefit balance of hormone therapy use is complicated and must be individualized. Research has determined that estrogen has a significant role in overall brain health and cognitive function. This ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-10-18
  • Solitary Confinement Tied to Greater Risk of Death After Prison Release
    Prisoners who are held in restrictive housing (i.e., solitary confinement) face an increased risk of death after their release, according to a new study led by researchers from the University of North Carolina (UNC) at Chapel Hill. The findings show that incarcerated individuals who were placed in restrictive housing in ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-10-18
  • Slower Walkers Have Older Brains and Bodies at 45
    A new study shows that people with a lower walking speed at the age of 45 have accelerated aging of both their bodies and their brains. Using a 19-measure scale, researchers at Duke University found that in slower walkers, their lungs, teeth and immune systems tended to be in worse ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-10-18
  • Rest After Trauma May Help Decrease PTSD Symptoms
    New research suggests a period of rest following a traumatic event can help reduce the subsequent development of involuntary “memory intrusions,” a frequent symptom of post-traumatic stress disorder. Memory intrusions can be both visual or non-visual and are often referred to as flashbacks. The study, published in Scientific Reports, discovered ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-10-18
  • Two-Year-Olds From Poor Neighborhoods More Likely to Have Language Difficulties
    Two-year-olds from disadvantaged backgrounds are three times more likely to develop difficulties with language than those from more affluent areas, according to a new Scottish study published in the journal JAMA Network Open. Researchers say the findings highlight the need for policy makers to address the social factors that can ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-10-18

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