Psychology News

  • Many Patients Hide Life-Threatening Issues From Their Doctors
    A new study finds that many patients who have faced domestic violence, sexual assault, depression or thoughts of suicide are likely to hide this information from their healthcare providers. The findings, published online in JAMA Network Open, show that up to 47.5 percent of patients who have experienced one or ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-08-23
  • Older People More Likely to Punish, Even for Accidental Harm
    As people get older, they are more likely to want to punish others for acts that cause harm, even if no harm was intended, according to new research. “Although older adults are capable of empathizing [about] someone’s intentions when making a moral evaluation, they appear less likely to do so ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-08-23
  • Working With Animals Can Increase Risk of Depression, Anxiety and Suicide
    “Talking about veterinarian suicide certainly gets people to pay attention, but it does not tell the whole, nuanced story about what may be contributing to poor well-being in this population,” said Katherine Goldberg, DVM, LMSW, community consultation and intervention specialist at Cornell Health and founder of Whole Animal Veterinary Geriatrics ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-08-23
  • Teens of Color Shy Away from Peers with Mental Health Issues
    New research has found that students identifying as black or Latino are more likely to say they would socially distance themselves from peers with a mental illness. This partiality is a key indicator of mental illness stigma, according to research published by the American Psychological Association. Researchers believe the findings ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-08-23
  • Depression is the Strongest Predictor of Substance Use in Pregnancy
    A new Canadian study finds that depression is the single largest driver of substance use during pregnancy, highlighting the need for greater support for the mental health of pregnant women. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the rate of pregnant women with a depression diagnosis at ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-08-23
  • Addiction Intervention in Hospital Can Be A ‘Reachable Moment’
    Addiction patients who meet with an intervention team in the hospital are twice as likely to participate in treatment for substance use disorder after they are discharged, according to a new study published in the Journal of General Internal Medicine. “This confirms that hospitalization is a reachable moment,” said lead ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-08-22
  • Is It Autism? The Line is Getting Blurry
    Autism diagnoses are on the rise worldwide. In the U.S., the prevalence of autism has increased from 0.05 percent in 1966 to more than 2 percent today. In Quebec, the reported prevalence is close to 2 percent, and according to a paper issued by the province’s public health department, the ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-08-22
  • Living Close to Green Space Linked to Better Mental Health
    A new study by U.K. researchers suggests living close (within 300 meters) of urban green space is associated with greater happiness, sense of worth and life satisfaction. In American terms, this means living within about three football fields from green space such as parks, nature reserves or play areas. Researchers ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-08-21
  • Machine Learning/AI Can ID People Who Need Specialist Care for Depression
    Researchers have created decision models to predict which patients might need more treatment for their depression than what their primary care provider can offer. Scientists say the algorithms are specifically designed to provide information the clinician can act on and fit into existing clinical workflows. Experts note that depression is ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-08-21
  • Lack of Vitamin D in Kids Tied to Aggression, Depressive Symptoms in Adolescence
    Vitamin D deficiency in childhood may be associated with a greater risk for aggressive behavior and anxious and depressive moods in adolescence, according to a new University of Michigan (U-M) study of schoolchildren in Bogotá, Colombia. The findings, published in the Journal of Nutrition, show that children with blood vitamin ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-08-21
  • Good Stories May Strengthen Weak Facts But Weaken Strong Facts
    A new study finds that a good story can increase the persuasiveness of weak facts, but it may actually decrease the persuasiveness of strong facts. Previous psychological research on this subject has demonstrated that stories often result in more persuasion among listeners. But why this is so has been less ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-08-20
  • Traumatized Adults May Find Touch, Closeness Less Appealing
    Adults who were traumatized as children may be more likely to keep a greater physical distance between themselves and strangers, and may also find touch stimuli less comforting than people without a history of trauma, according to a team of researchers from Bonn University Hospital (UKB) and Ruhr University Bochum ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-08-20
  • IBD in Childhood May Up Risk of Mental Health Issues
    A new Swedish study suggests children with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have a greater risk for psychiatric disorders. Researchers believe that more psychological support and longer follow-up is needed for the children affected and their parents. Investigators explain that it is already known that adults with IBD (ulcerative colitis or ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-08-20
  • Moderate Drinking in Pregnancy Can Alter Genes in Newborns, Mothers
    Pregnant women who drink moderate to high levels of alcohol may be altering their babies’ DNA, according to a new study published in the journal Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research. The results also show that infants who were exposed to alcohol in the womb via the umbilical cord had increased ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-08-19
  • Educational Setbacks for Some Summer-Born Preemies
    Children born just a few weeks prematurely, who consequently fall into an earlier school year, are more likely to experience significant setbacks in their education after their first year of school, according to a new study from the University of Leeds in England. The findings are published in the journal ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-08-19

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