Psychology News

  • Customized Alzheimer’s Prevention Plan Targets Risk Factors
    With disease-modifying treatment trials for Alzheimer’s disease unsuccessful and only medications to treat symptoms available, what is next in the fight against the growing threat of AD? James E. Galvin, M.D., M.P.H., a renowned neuroscientist at Florida Atlantic University, believes thinking “out-of-the-box” can help. Accordingly, a new program called the ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-09-26
  • Evening Dose of Long-Acting ADHD Med Closer to Release
    Although long-acting psychostimulants, including methylphenidate (MPH), provide helpful pharmacotherapy for youth with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), the medications often have a two-hour time delay before they become effective. The practice of taking meds the first thing in the morning commonly means a user is vulnerable to inadequate symptom control and ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-09-26
  • Child Abuse May Alter Neurons in Brain
    Adults who were victims of child abuse tend to have thinner layers of myelin coating in the brain, according to a new study by McGill University in Canada. Myelin is the protective fatty coating that covers the long thread-like parts of nerve cells called axons and helps them conduct electrical ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-09-26
  • Personal Growth Often Requires Supportive Environment
    New research suggests highly motivated people who possess a strong desire for personal growth need supportive relationships in order to accomplish their goals. The “I-through-We” perspective views the social tendency to connect with others, and the individual tendency to strive and grow as individuals, as not being mutually exclusive. And, ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-09-26
  • Jaw Dysfunction May Intensify Migraines
    A new study reveals an association between migraine attacks and temporomandibular joint dysfunction (TMJ). TMJ is a stress-related condition and is characterized by joint pain, reduced jaw movement, clicking or popping of the temporomandibular joint and neck and face pain. Researchers at the University of São Paulo’s Ribeirão Preto School ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-09-25
  • UK Study: Nearly 1 in 4 Girls Depressed at Age 14
    A large study on more than 10,000 children born in 2000-01 reveals a significant rate of depression among teen girls and boys. Researchers from the University of Liverpool and University College London analyzed responses from the Millennium Cohort Study and discovered a quarter of girls (24 percent) and one in 10 boys (9 ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-09-25
  • High Manganese Levels Tied to Low IQ Scores in Children
    A new study, published in the journal NeuroToxicology, shows that children who test higher for levels of manganese (Mn) in their hair tend to have significantly lower IQ scores. Manganese, a trace mineral, is nutritionally essential to humans but toxic when ingested in high amounts. Manganese is used widely in ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-09-25
  • New Genetic Test Can Assess Alzheimer’s Risk
    Predicting a person’s risk for Alzheimer’s disease is not an easy task as a multitude of genetic factors may play a role. Accordingly, a team of California researchers developed a new test that combines the effects of more than two dozen genetic variants, most associated by themselves with only a ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-09-25
  • Stricter Alcohol Policies Tied to Fewer Alcohol-Related Homicides
    Stricter alcohol policies, including taxes and sales restrictions, help lower the odds of alcohol-related homicides, according to new research at Boston Medical Center (BMC) and Boston University (BU). The new findings highlight the importance of making tighter alcohol control policies as a way to help reduce violence, including homicide. Alcohol ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-09-24
  • Even Babies Can Learn Hard Work Pays Off
    A new study has discovered that babies try harder after seeing adults struggle to achieve a goal. The study shows that babies as young as 15 months who watched an adult struggle at two different tasks before succeeding tried harder at their own difficult task, compared to babies who saw ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-09-24
  • Preterm Babies at Greater Risk of Medical Sleep Problems
    Healthy toddlers who were born prematurely are at greater risk of medical sleep problems than healthy full-term toddlers, but they tend to have an easier time falling asleep independently, according to a new study published in the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine. The findings show that young children (average age ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-09-24
  • Study Finds No Evidence of Personality Change Before Dementia Onset
    A new comprehensive study from Florida State University (FSU) finds no evidence to support the idea that personality changes begin before the clinical onset of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or dementia. MCI is an intermediate stage falling between the expected cognitive decline of natural aging and the more severe decline ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-09-24
  • New Fingerprint Test Can Detect Cocaine Use in Minutes
    Scientists have developed a fast-acting, highly sensitive fingerprint test to determine whether a person has recently used cocaine. The new tool comes as a result of the first large scale study of cocaine users and may lead to similar tests designed to detect other Class A substances. Researchers from the ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-09-23
  • New Therapy Technique Offers Hope to Those with Fibromyalgia
    Psychotherapy that encourages addressing emotional experiences related to trauma, conflict and relationship problems has been found helpful for people with the chronic pain condition fibromyalgia. In the randomized clinical trial at Wayne State University in Detroit, 230 adults with fibromyalgia received one of three treatments. Each was presented for eight ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-09-23
  • Are You Happy You Voted — Or Didn’t?
    New research shows that, in general, people who vote are “very happy” with their choices and those who did not vote doubt they did the right thing. In a study published in Party Politics, researchers from the University of Montreal looked at 22 election surveys conducted in Canada, France, Germany, ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-09-23

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