Psychology News

  • New Psychotherapy Approach Helps Abused Kids
    A new developmentally adapted cognitive processing therapy specializing on the situations and needs of teens and young adults between the ages of 14 and 21 promises to improve care for this targeted group. German researchers developed the approach to improve both short and long-term outcomes for children who have suffered ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-05-24
  • Study: Esketamine Nasal Spray Safe and Effective for Depression
    Emerging research supports the use of Esketamine nasal spray in treating depression among people who have not responded to previous treatment. Esketamine is revolutionary as it provides fast-acting treatment for people that have not responded to other depression treatments. The study, published online in the American Journal of Psychiatry, is ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-05-24
  • Broccoli Sprout Compound May Help Restore Brain Chemistry Imbalance in Schizophrenia
    In a series of recently published studies in humans and animals, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say they have identified certain glutamate-related chemical imbalances in the brains of schizophrenia patients —  and that these imbalances may potentially be reversed using a compound derived from broccoli sprouts, known as sulforaphane. “It’s possible ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-05-24
  • Use Exercise to Improve Teen Sleep
    Getting good sleep is especially important during adolescence as teens are developing cognitive skills, learning to mitigate stress and formulating lifelong health behavioral habits. While previous research suggests that adolescents need eight to ten hours of sleep a night, recent estimates suggest that as many as 73 percent of ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-05-24
  • ‘Augmented Reality’ Experiences Can Influence Later Behavior
    As major technology firms ramp up production of augmented reality products, a new study from Stanford researchers assessed how the virtual experiences will affect people’s behavior – in the both the physical world and a digitally enhanced one. In recent years, companies have focused on developing augmented reality goggles and ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-05-23
  • Childhood Trauma Tied to Teen Violence, Depression
    Children from poor urban areas who are exposed to traumatic events such as physical and emotional neglect, violence, and sexual abuse are more likely to experience depression and violence in the teen years, according to a new worldwide study from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. The findings, ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-05-23
  • Managing Gut Bacteria May Help Relieve Anxiety
    People who suffer from anxiety symptoms may find some relief by regulating their gut microorganisms through the use of both probiotic and non-probiotic food and supplements, according to a new review of studies published in the journal General Psychiatry. Increasingly, research has shown that gut microbiota — the trillions of microorganisms ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-05-22
  • Rapid Change in Weight Linked to Higher Dementia Risk in Older Adults
    Older adults who experience significant weight gain or loss within a couple of years may be at greater risk of dementia, according to a new Korean study published in the journal BMJ Open. Dementia is a critical public health issue considering our aging population and the increased life expectancy. In ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-05-22
  • Poll: 1 in 3 Think Social Media Can Damage Mental Health
    A new poll released by the American Psychiatric Association (APA) suggests Americans generally believe social media has a more negative than positive influence on mental and emotional well-being. The APA sponsored poll was conducted online from a nationally representative sample of 1,005 adults during the period April 4-7, 2019, and ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-05-22
  • Regular Word and Number Puzzles Tied to Sharper Mind in Older Adults
    Older adults who regularly play word and number puzzles tend to have sharper brain function, according to new U.K. research published in the International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry. “We’ve found that the more regularly people engage with puzzles such as crosswords and Sudoku, the sharper their performance is across a ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-05-21
  • Teens with ADHD Far More Likely to Engage in Risky Driving, Get Into Accidents
    A new large-scale study finds that teen drivers with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are significantly more likely to get into car accidents, be issued traffic and moving violations, and engage in risky driving behaviors, compared to their non-ADHD peers. An estimated 6.1 million children ages 2 to 17 living in ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-05-21
  • Mom’s Support When Dad Cares for Baby Key to How He Sees Their Relationship
    How a new father feels about his changing relationship with his partner may depend in part on how much support he feels from her when he is caring for their baby, according to a new study published in the journal Family Process. Researchers from Ohio State University found that a ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-05-20
  • Some Concussion Patients Suffer from Persistent Fatigue, Poor Brain Function
    A recent Australian study sheds new light on the debilitating effects of persistent post-concussion symptoms (PCS) felt by approximately 10 percent of concussion patients. Lingering concussion symptoms often include significant levels of fatigue and poorer brain function, which can persist for months, or even years, following concussion. For the study, concussion ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-05-20
  • Study: Fast Walkers Tend to Live Longer
    Fast walkers tend to have a longer life expectancy than slower walkers, regardless of the person’s body weight or obesity status, according to a new study conducted by researchers at the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Leicester Biomedical Research Centre in the U.K. The research, using data of 474,919 ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-05-20
  • Current Thinking Can Distort Memories of Love
    New research suggests as our memories fade, we rely on our current assessment of a person to remember how we felt about them in the past. This extends to some of the most central figures in our lives — our parents. “Memories of the love we felt in childhood towards ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-05-20

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