Psychology News

  • More MD Visits Tied to Fewer Suicide Attempts in Fibromyalgia Patients
    Fibromyalgia patients who regularly see their doctors are much less likely to attempt suicide compared to patients who rarely visit the doctor, according to a new study at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. Fibromyalgia is a chronic condition characterized by widespread pain with associated fatigue, sleep and mood issues. Although it ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-09-20
  • Study Finds You Can Handle The Truth, After All
    New research from the University of Chicago Booth School of Business explores the consequences of honesty in everyday life and finds that people can often afford to be more honest than they think. In the paper, Dr. Emma Levine of the Booth school and Carnegie Mellon University’s Dr. Taya Cohen ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-09-20
  • Racial Discrimination Can Take A Heavy Toll on Latino and Asian Teens
    Latino and Asian adolescents who face racial or ethnic discrimination are more likely to experience depression, poor self-esteem, lower academic achievement, substance use and risky sexual behavior, according to a new meta-analysis published in the journal American Psychologist. The findings reveal that young people of Asian and Latino backgrounds were ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-09-19
  • Seeing Yourself as Busy Can Bolster Self-Control
    In a new study, researchers from the global business school INSEAD find that although busyness is often thought of as a modern-day affliction, it can help delay gratification and provide long-term benefits. “Every day, we make many decisions that involve choosing between our immediate and future well-being. For instance, do ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-09-19
  • Are Human Brains Hardwired for Laziness?
    A new Canadian study published in the journal Neuropsychologia suggests that our brains may be hardwired to prefer relaxing on the couch over something active. This is because conserving energy is one of our brain’s top priorities. Researchers at the University of British Columbia (UBC) investigated the “exercise paradox:” For ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-09-19
  • Bursts of In-Class Exercise Can Aid Fitness Without Disruption
    As childhood obesity continues to rise and physical education classes are replaced by academics, elementary schools are searching for ways to incorporate the federally mandated half-hour of physical activity into the school day. In-class exercise tends to put off many teachers who believe that the burst of activity in the ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-09-18
  • Big Data Study Challenges Thinking on Personality Types
    New research using Big Data suggests established psychological paradigms on personality types may need to be revised. In the study, Northwestern University researchers analyzed data from more than 1.5 million questionnaire respondents. The review discovered at least four distinct clusters of personality types exist: average, reserved, self-centered and role model. ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-09-18
  • Complex Gambling Decisions Often Followed by Regret
    A new study shows that after placing a bet, a gambler is beset by many emotions, including anticipation of a big payoff, doubts about the wisdom of the bet, and regret about previous bets. “Right after making a choice and right before finding out about the outcome, the brain is ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-09-18
  • Suspending Youngest Students May Harm More Than Help
    New research finds that when kindergartners and first-graders are suspended from school, they can find it very difficult to get back on the right track both behaviorally and academically — especially boys. Despite significant evidence demonstrating the detrimental effects of school suspension, there have been major gaps in research about ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-09-17
  • Drum Lessons Can Help Autistic Kids In School
    PHOTO: https://www.eurekalert.org/multimedia/pub/180502.php Playing the drums for an hour a week can help autistic children learn in school, according to a new study. The study, from researchers at the University of Chichester and University Centre Hartpury in England, found that students’ ability to follow instructions improved after 10 weeks of drumming, ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-09-16
  • Chemicals in Beauty Products May Affect Women’s Hormones
    Chemicals that are commonly used as ingredients in cosmetic and personal care products may lead to changes in reproductive hormones in women, according to a new study published in the journal Environment International. For the study, researchers at George Mason University in Virginia collected 509 urine samples from 143 women ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-09-16
  • Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual Youth at Increased Risk of Using Multiple Substances
    Young people who identify as lesbian, gay, or bisexual are at increased risk of using substances such as alcohol, nicotine, and marijuana, according to a new study. The study from researchers at Oregon State University also found that these teens are at a higher risk of using more than one ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-09-16
  • Brief CBT Can Benefit Women Caring for Kids with Severe Health Issues
    A new study finds that brief cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) can significantly improve the mental health of women overwhelmed by caring for children with severe chronic health conditions, such as cerebral palsy or cystic fibrosis. Brief CBT, a short-term goal-oriented form of psychotherapy, offers a hands-on practical approach to problem-solving and ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-09-15
  • Personality Traits May Help Predict Holiday Spending
    Sales during the holiday season can represent up to 20 percent of annual revenue for retailers. How consumers spend their money during this time is of interest for store owners as well as for those looking to better understand and control their spending habits. In a new study, researchers wanted ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-09-15
  • One-Third of College Freshmen Report Symptoms of Mental Illness
    A new study finds that freshmen from 19 colleges in eight countries report symptoms consistent with a diagnosable psychological disorder. “While effective care is important, the number of students who need treatment for these disorders far exceeds the resources of most counseling centers, resulting in a substantial unmet need for ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-09-15

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