Psychology News

  • Mom’s Help Kids Manage Negative Emotions, But What if Mom Becomes Stressed
    Parenting is not an easy task requiring patience, discipline and love. The responsibility is especially challenging for mothers as they often take a leadership role in helping a child learn to manage their emotions. When children become upset, showing negative emotions or behaviors, some parents become distressed themselves, while ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-11-20
  • Co-Parenting After A Violent Marriage: What to Expect
    Sadly, intimate partner violence is not uncommon among divorcing couples. And, when kids are involved, the first year after the relationship break-up is critical as this is when custody and co-parenting arrangements are being decided. In a new study, researchers at the University of Illinois investigated important factors pertaining to ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-11-20
  • Neural Flexibility May Be Key to Human Intelligence
    A new study suggests that flexible wiring may be at the heart of human intelligence rather than stemming from a single region or brain cell efficiency as other theories have suggested. The findings, published in the journal Trends in Cognitive Sciences,  show that the brain’s dynamic properties, how it is ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-11-20
  • Sexual Harassment at Work Called Pervasive, Chronic
    Despite the public uproar over recent events in Hollywood and on Capitol Hill, sexual harassment in the workplace is not a new issue. Such behavior is a pervasive, chronic problem that can cause enduring psychological harm, according to the president of the American Psychological Association. “Sexual harassment in the workplace ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-11-20
  • Heavy Smoking, Drinking Tied to Premature Aging
    A new Danish study confirms what many may already suspect: that heavy drinking and smoking are linked to physical signs of premature aging. “This is the first prospective study to show that alcohol and smoking are associated with the development of visible age-related signs and thus generally looking older than ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-11-19
  • For Older Women, Every Movement Counts Toward Health
    For women over 65, every bit of light physical activity — even as minor as making the bed or walking to the car — may carry a reduced risk of mortality, according to a new study published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. “Every movement counts,” said Andrea ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-11-19
  • Performance Pressure May Lead Employees to Cheat
    Why do employees cheat? Too much pressure, according to a new study. Researchers at the University of Georgia found that high-pressure expectations in the workplace lead to unethical behavior. Volkswagen did it to pass emissions tests. Wells Fargo did it to squeeze more money from their customers. Some school districts ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-11-19
  • Boosting Brain Activity May Buffer Against Anxiety
    A new study at Duke University finds that boosting brain activity in regions related to thinking and problem-solving may help buffer against anxiety. The researchers found that people at greater risk for anxiety were less likely to develop the disorder if they had higher activity in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-11-19
  • Eating Nuts May Strengthen Some Brain Waves
    New research has found that eating nuts on a regular basis strengthens brain wave frequencies associated with cognition, healing, learning, memory, and other key brain functions. Researchers at Loma Linda University in California found that some nuts stimulated some brain frequencies more than others. Pistachios, for instance, produced the greatest ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-11-18
  • In Rat Study, Chronic Stress Can Lead to Risky Decisions
    Making a decision between two options that have both positive and negative elements, such as deciding between a job with a high salary but long hours, and a lower-paying job that allows for more leisure time, is not always easy. Neuroscientists at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have now discovered ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-11-18
  • Dog Owners May Be Less Likely to Die of Heart Attack
    In a new Swedish study investigating the association between dog ownership and cardiovascular health, researchers found that dog owners have a reduced risk of death due to cardiovascular disease and other causes. The protective link is particularly strong among people who live alone and among those who own dog breeds ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-11-18
  • Which Drivers Are More Likely to Be Distracted?
    A new study has found that young men, people who drive more often, and extraverted or neurotic people are more likely to be distracted while driving. The study, published in Frontiers in Psychology, also found that older women and those who felt that they could control their distracted behavior were ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-11-18
  • Mainstreaming Kids with ASD May be Harmful Unless Culture Improved
    New research suggests that policies that put children with special needs into classrooms with their peers who have no disabilities, may be harmful to the children unless schools develop programs to create a culture of acceptance. Proponents of mainstreaming have focused on the possible benefits for both traditional and special needs students by co-mingling ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-11-17
  • Codeine Still Prescribed to Kids Despite Strict FDA Warning
    A new multi-university study finds that up to one in 20 children were still being prescribed codeine to treat pain after tonsil and adenoid surgery, despite a “black box warning” being issued by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) two years prior stating that opioid use after routine pediatric surgeries ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-11-17
  • Randomized Trial: Computerized Brain Training Can Reduce Risk of Dementia
    A newly published study is the first to show that computerized brain-training can reduce the risk of dementia among older adults. Researchers from the University of South Florida say the findings from a 10-year study suggests a particular type of computerized brain training called “speed of processing training” or, ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-11-17

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