Psychology News

  • Colder, Darker Climates Tied to Increased Alcohol Consumption
    People living in colder regions with less sunlight are more likely to consume more alcohol than their warmer-weather counterparts, according to a new study published online in the journal Hepatology. Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh’s Division of Gastroenterology found that as temperature and sunlight hours drop, alcohol consumption tends ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-11-19
  • Workplace Bullying & Violence Can Boost Risk of Cardiovascular Ills
    A new study has found a link between being bullied at work or experiencing violence at work and a higher risk of heart attacks and stroke. “If there is a causal link between bullying or violence at work and cardiovascular disease, then the removal of workplace bullying would mean we ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-11-18
  • Using Music as Sleep Aid
    A new study shows that many individuals use music to fight sleep difficulties. Sleep loss is a widespread problem with serious physical and economic consequences, and music might serve as a cheap, non-pharmaceutical sleep aid, the researchers noted. However, there is a lack of systematic data on how widely it ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-11-18
  • Omega-3 Fatty Acids May Reduce Risk of Premature Birth
    Expectant women who increase their intake of omega-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) can reduce the risk of premature birth, according to a new study published in the Cochrane Review. “We know premature birth is a critical global health issue, with an estimated 15 million babies born too early each ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-11-17
  • Pain Intensity May Be Affected by Your Expectations
    Expectations of pain intensity can become a self-fulfilling prophecy, according to a new brain imaging study published in the journal Nature Human Behaviour. In fact, false expectations of pain levels can persist even when reality repeatedly demonstrates otherwise. “We discovered that there is a positive feedback loop between expectation and ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-11-17
  • Social Isolation Linked to Higher Risk of Death
    A new study links social isolation with a higher risk of death. Researchers at the American Cancer Society note that social isolation was associated with a higher risk of death from all causes, including heart disease, for all races studied. There also was an increased risk of death from cancer ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-11-17
  • Some Social Media Activity May Damage Body Image
    New research suggests that when young women actively engage with social media images of friends who they think are more attractive than themselves, they report feeling worse about their own appearance afterward. York University researchers said it is accepted that social media can blur the lines of what’s real and ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-11-16
  • Bias-Based Bullying May Do More Harm Than General Bullying
    Bias-based bullying — or bullying that stems from prejudice — may cause more harm to students than generalized bullying, particularly for those who are targeted because of multiple identities, such as race and religion, according to a new study published in the journal Psychology of Violence. “Bias-based bullying is when ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-11-16
  • Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Improves Sleep for Prisoners with Insomnia
    Nearly three in four prisoners with insomnia experienced major improvements to their sleep and wellbeing after receiving cognitive behavioral therapy, according to a new U.K. study published in the journal Behavioural Sleep Medicine. The findings show that a single one-hour session of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) was effective in preventing ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-11-16
  • Parents Should Have Ongoing Talks With Teens About Sex
    For many a parent, having “the conversation” with your child about sex is a one-time event. New research now suggests that when it comes to your teens, one vague and generic conversation about sex is not enough. Brigham Young University family life professor Dr. Laura Padilla-Walker discovered ongoing communication about ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-11-15
  • Research Suggests Link Between Obesity and Depression
    New evidence points to a link between obesity and depression, even in the absence of additional health problems. The findings stem from a large scale genomic analysis which suggests the psychological impact of being overweight causes depression rather than associated illnesses such as diabetes. Researchers from the University of South ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-11-15
  • Behavioral Therapy for Obesity Shown to Aid in Weight Loss
    Obese patients who receive regular sessions of intensive behavioral therapy (IBT), which provides diet and physical activity counseling, can achieve meaningful weight loss in six to 12 months, according to a new Penn Medicine study published in the journal Obesity. The study is the first randomized controlled evaluation of the ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-11-14
  • Perception of Multitasking Can Aid Performance
    Although research has shown that actual multitasking hinders performance of individual tasks, a new study finds that if we believe we are multitasking then our performance is improved by helping us be more focused on the task at hand. University of Michigan researchers performed a series of experiments that found ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-11-14
  • Warmer Winter Temps May Be Tied to More Crime
    Crime rates may be related to how outside temperatures affect our daily lives, according to a new study published in the journal GeoHealth. The researchers say that milder winter weather has increased regional crime rates in the United States over the past several decades. The new findings support the theory ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-11-14
  • Parental Interventions to Improve Behavior Are Not Just for Youngest Kids
    A new study from the U.K. finds that parenting interventions for children with behavior problems are just as effective in school-age as in younger children. Findings from the Oxford University study run counter to the  view that interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-11-13

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