Psychology News

  • Tech Tracking, Cardiac Imaging & Genetics Show Lack of Sleep Impacts Aging, Disease Risk
    In a new study, researchers deployed wearable trackers, genetic analysis and cardiac imaging to measure how insufficient sleep can fuel cardiovascular disease risk markers and accelerate biological aging. Insufficient sleep has been linked to poor health in many studies. For this study, researchers from the SingHealth Duke-NUS Institute of Precision ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-11-14
  • Cholesterol, Fat Profiles at Birth Tied to Psychological Health at Age 5
    A new study finds that infants born with high levels of bad cholesterol and a certain type of fat may face greater risk for social and psychological problems in childhood. The findings, published in the journal Psychological Science, show that a standard blood test taken at birth could predict how ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-11-14
  • Yoga, Breathing Exercise Can Ease Depression and Anxiety Now And In Months Ahead
    A variety of scientific studies have supported yoga practice as a means to ease depression and anxiety. Now, a new study out of Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) provides evidence that yoga and breathing exercises can improve symptoms of depression and anxiety both in the short and long run. ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-11-14
  • Preterm Kids May Have Impulsivity Issues Like Those Deprived in Orphanages
    Children who were born preterm or at very low birth weight have similar temperament issues as those who experienced deprivation or neglect in an orphanage for at least 6 months, according to a new study published in the journal Development and Psychopathology. Specifically, the findings show that six-year-olds who were ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-11-13
  • Canadian Study: Poor Nutrition May Hike Risk for Depression
    New research suggests one’s diet can increase the risk of depression. Investigators also discovered the likelihood of depression is higher among middle-aged and older women immigrants to Canada. “Lower intakes of fruits and vegetables were found to be linked to depression for both men and women, immigrants and those born ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-11-13
  • Listening to Music May Ease Heart Stress of Bad Traffic
    Listening to music can lessen the cardiac stress of driving in heavy traffic, according to a small Brazilian study by researchers at São Paulo State University (UNESP). Driving-related stress is a risk factor for both cardiovascular disease and sudden cardiac complications such as heart attack (myocardial infarction), according to recent ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-11-13
  • Brief Meditation Can Alter Brain Activity Tied to Increased Error Recognition
    Non-meditators who engage in just one 20-minute session of “open monitoring meditation” show changes in brain activity suggesting increased error recognition, according to a new EEG study at Michigan State University (MSU). Open monitoring meditation is a form of meditation that focuses awareness on feelings, thoughts or sensations as they ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-11-12
  • Racial Discrimination Tied to Suicidal Thoughts in African-American Men
    Suicide deaths among African-American men have risen dramatically during the last 20 years, with racial discrimination pinpointed as a contributing factor in many cases. A new study from researchers at the University of Michigan found that various forms of discrimination are associated with increased rates of depression. When it involves ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-11-11
  • Mouse Study: How Infections in Pregnancy May Be Linked to Psychiatric Disorders
    Maternal infections during pregnancy can impair fetal brain development and lead to cognitive problems, according to a new Danish study conducted on mice. The researchers believe these impairments help explain why infections during pregnancy have been linked to psychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia and autism. The findings are published in ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-11-11
  • Youth Suicides Shown to Rise With Poverty Levels
    New research shows that U.S. children living in counties with the highest poverty rates are 37 percent more likely to die by suicide than those living in the least impoverished counties. The association is most pronounced for suicide by firearms, according to researchers. Youth suicide has nearly doubled in the ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-11-11
  • What Issues Do Americans Worry About the Most?
    According to this year’s “Stress in America” survey, Americans report various issues in the news as significant sources of stress, including health care, climate change, mass shootings and the upcoming presidential election. “There is a lot of uncertainty in our world right now — from mass shootings to climate change. ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-11-11
  • Sleep Problems Linked to Greater Risk of Stroke, Heart Attack
    People with insomnia symptoms, such as having trouble falling or staying asleep, may be more likely to have a stroke, heart attack or other cerebrovascular or cardiovascular diseases, according to a new Chinese study published in the journal Neurology. “These results suggest that if we can target people who are ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-11-10
  • Only Close, Face-to-Face Relationships Tied to Greater Well-Being
    A smaller number of quality face-to-face relationships — as opposed to numerous online contacts —boosts well-being among people of all ages, and may be as important to people under age 45 as they are to those over age 60, according to a new study published in the journal Psychology and ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-11-10
  • To Optimize Learning, Fail 15 Percent of the Time
    Educators have long recognized there is a “sweet spot” when it comes to learning — we learn best when we are challenged to grasp something just outside the bounds of our existing knowledge. When a challenge is too simple, we don’t learn anything new. But we also don’t learn anything ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-11-09
  • Anorexia Nervosa Comes in All Sizes, Including Plus Size
    A new study from the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), finds adolescents and young adults whose weight is in the healthy, overweight or obese ranges face similar cardiovascular and other health complications as their counterparts with low body mass index (BMI). Researchers compared weight loss and illness severity among ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-11-09

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