Psychology News

  • Attachment Style May Affect Willingness to Share Food
    In a new study, University of Kansas (KU) researchers examined the link between food-sharing and styles of attachment. They found that people with “attachment avoidance,” a psychological term for reluctance to form close personal relationships, tend to have a harder time sharing their food with others. The researchers say the ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-03-31
  • Targeting Unhealthy Lifestyles May Increase Longevity in Those With Severe Mental Illness
    Addressing unhealthy lifestyle factors among people with severe mental illness could potentially provide the greatest benefit in increasing life expectancy, according to a new U.K. study conducted by researchers at King’s College London. Severe mental illnesses include schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, bipolar disorder and major depression. In particular, the study found ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-03-30
  • Many Sports Medicine Students Struggle With Constant Pain
    A large number of people with sports-centered majors or careers struggle with constant pain, either physical or psychological, according to a new German study at Goethe University Frankfurt. “One in three top athletes suffers significant pain,” said Dr. Johannes Fleckenstein, private lecturer at Goethe University. And while little research has ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-03-30
  • Women More Likely to Feel Unsafe on Public Transport
    A new international study shows that, on average, women are 10 percent more likely than men to feel unsafe on metro trains (trains that go underground) and 6 percent more likely than men to feel unsafe on buses. Researchers from Imperial College London analyzed more than 327,000 passenger responses to ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-03-30
  • Daily Aspirin May Not Reduce Dementia Risk
    A new Australian study finds that, contrary to popular belief, taking low-dose aspirin once a day does not appear to lower the risk of thinking and memory problems caused by mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or probable Alzheimer’s disease, nor does it slow the rate of cognitive decline. Due to aspirin’s ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-03-30
  • COVID-19 Survey: How NYC Residents Are Holding Up
    Nearly 3 in 10 New York City residents (29%) report that either they or someone in their household has lost their job as a result of coronavirus (COVID-19) over the last two weeks, according to a tracking survey conducted by City University of New York (CUNY) Graduate School of Public ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-03-29
  • Aging Associated with Emotional Stability
    New research suggests one benefit of growing older is improved emotional stability. Duke and Vanderbilt university investigators also found that older people are also better able to resist temptations in their daily lives. Prior to the current investigation, research was mixed on whether older adults are better at regulating emotion ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-03-29
  • For Mental Well-Being, Live in Moment But Plan For Future
    People who manage to balance living in the moment with planning for the future are best able to weather daily stress without succumbing to negative moods, according to a new study by researchers from North Carolina (NC) State University. “It’s well established that daily stressors can make us more likely ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-03-29
  • CDC Report: Autism Rates Continue to Increase
    In 2016, autism spectrum disorder (ASD) affected 1 in 54 (or 1.85 percent) 8-year-olds, according to the newest U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) report. This is a 10 percent increase from the most recent report two years prior when it was 1 in 59, and the highest ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-03-28
  • Study: Say ‘Thank You’ Instead of ‘Sorry’ to Unhappy Customers
    A new study suggests that showing appreciation (saying “thank you”) may be a more effective strategy than apologizing (saying “I’m sorry”) when it comes to restoring customer satisfaction. For the study, researchers from New Mexico State University, University of South Carolina, Zhejiang University (China), and The Ohio State University examined ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-03-28
  • Fake Facebook Ads Adeptly Used Fear and Anger To Divide Americans
    Facebook users scrolling through their feeds in fall 2016 faced a minefield of targeted advertisements pitting blacks against police, southern whites against immigrants, gun owners against Obama supporters, and the LGBTQ community against the conservative right. Placed by Russian trolls, they didn’t aim to prop up one candidate or cause, ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-03-28
  • Study: Lower Income Associated with Higher Autism Rates
    Emerging research suggests that over the past two decades, the prevalence of autism has fallen among wealthy and white populations yet risen in communities of poor whites and minorities. Experts believe better screening of low-income populations along with environmental factors play a role in the demographic change. Environmental factors ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-03-27
  • Study IDs Psychosis Risk Factors During and After Pregnancy
    U.K. researchers have discovered several pregnancy-related risk factors linked to the development of psychotic disorders in offspring. These prenatal and perinatal risks, including the age of the parents, nutritional deficiencies and low birth weight, appear to have a significant effect on the likelihood of a child developing psychosis. Psychotic disorders are ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-03-27
  • Researchers ID Substance That May Ease Side Effects of Tricyclic Antidepressants
    Danish researchers have discovered a new substance that may help relieve some of the more severe side effects of tricyclic antidepressants. Tricyclic antidepressants, such clomipramine (Anafranil) and amoxapine (Ascendin), are older generation-drugs still used to treat some patients with depression, bipolar or chronic pain. For some people, tricyclics are more ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-03-27
  • Is a ‘Sense of Obligation’ Good or Bad for a Relationship?
    We are in an unprecedented time as authorities ask individuals to practice social distancing. A timely new study looks at the obligations that may come along with staying connected, yet socially distant. Experts explain that when many are practicing “social distancing” from the outside world, people are relying on their ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-03-27

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