Psychology News

  • Healthy People from Alcoholic Families Release More Dopamine in Expectation of Alcohol
    Healthy individuals with a family history of alcohol use disorder (AUD) release more dopamine in the brain’s primary reward center in the expectation of alcohol than those who are actually diagnosed with the disorder, or healthy people without any family history of AUD, according to a new study published in ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-05-25
  • Depression May Speed Up Brain Aging
    Depression is associated with accelerated brain aging, according to a new study by psychologists at the University of Sussex in England. While previous research has shown that individuals with depression or anxiety have a greater risk for dementia in later life, this new study is the first to provide solid ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-05-25
  • How PTSD From Military Service Can Impact College Studies
    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) caused by traumatic military experiences is associated with feelings of anxiety, anger, sadness and/or guilt. New Penn State research suggests PTSD symptoms can also increase risks for academic difficulties. In the new study, Dr. Steffany Fredman, assistant professor of human development and family studies explored the ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-05-24
  • Genetic Mutations Help ID New Brain Development Disorder
    Scientists have identified a new genetic neurodevelopmental disease that can cause growth delays, seizures and learning problems in humans. Their findings are published in the journal eLife. The disorder is caused by a recessive mutation in the gene CAMK2A, known for its role in regulating learning and memory in animals. ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-05-24
  • Does Marriage Increase Risk of Diabetes?
    A Scandinavian study suggests the risk for diabetes is influenced by the home environment and especially by your partner. Danish researchers from the University of Copenhagen and Aarhus University have found a connection between the BMI of one spouse and the other spouse’s risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Prevention ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-05-23
  • Study: Suicide Rates for Black Kids Under 13 Double That of Whites
    Suicide rates among whites have traditionally been higher than for blacks in the United States. However, a new study shows that the racial differences in suicide rates may be age-specific. The findings, published in JAMA Pediatrics, reveal that suicide rates for black children aged 5-12 are approximately double than that ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-05-23
  • Younger Kids Already Grasp Plant-Animal Interdependence
    In a new Spanish study, researchers discovered that when young children (ages 4 to 7) were asked to create spontaneous drawings of plants, they demonstrated a clear understanding of the interdependent relationship between plants and animals. According to the researchers, this suggests that concepts related to biology, the environment and ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-05-22
  • More Exercise Helps Larger Arteries Stay Young
    As people age, the arteries that transport blood in and out of the heart are prone to hardening or stiffening, increasing the risk of heart disease. Although any form of exercise reduces the overall risk of death from heart problems, a new study finds different sizes of arteries are affected ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-05-22
  • Survey: Anxiety in US On the Rise, Especially About Finances
    Within the past year, anxiety among Americans has increased substantially, particularly around the issue of paying bills, according to a national poll recently released by the American Psychiatric Association (APA). On a scale of 1 to 100, this year’s overall national anxiety score is 51 — a five-point jump since 2017. ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-05-21
  • Brain Stimulation Shows Promise as Obesity Treatment
    Stimulating the brain to alter its intrinsic reward system shows promise in the treatment of obesity, according to results presented at the 2018 European Society of Endocrinology annual meeting. According to researchers, the technique has yielded positive results after just a single treatment session, revealing its potential to become a ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-05-21
  • Aging Stereotypes Buffered by Cultural Cues in Chinese Elders
    “Stereotype threat” is the fear that you will confirm to yourself or others that a negative stereotype about a group you belong to is true. For example, research has shown that older adults who have a fear of becoming the stereotypical “elderly person with dementia” are more likely to perform ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-05-20
  • Smarter Brains Seem to Run More Efficiently
    The more intelligent a person, the fewer connections there are between the neurons in his cerebral cortex, according to new research. For the study, researchers at the Ruhr-Universität Bochum in Germany, the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque, Humboldt University of Berlin, and the Lovelace Biomedical and Environmental Research Institute ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-05-20
  • Study Finds Our Brains are Obsessed with Being Social
    Our brains are obsessed with being social even when we are not in social situations, according to a new study. The new research demonstrates how our brains consolidate new social information during rest, according to a researcher at Dartmouth College. Published in Cerebral Cortex, the study shows how two regions ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-05-20
  • Language Skills May Have Greatest Impact on Kindergarten Readiness
    Preparing young children to be “kindergarten ready” is the goal of many parents and preschool programs. It is well-documented that the more skills children bring into kindergarten — in basic math, reading, even friendship and cooperation — the more likely they will succeed in those same areas in school. Now, a ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-05-20
  • Musicians, Bilinguals Show More Efficient Brain Activity
    Whether you learn to play a musical instrument or speak another language, you’re training your brain to be more efficient, according to new research. Researchers at Baycrest, a teaching hospital in Toronto, Canada, found that musicians and people who are bilingual activated different brain networks and showed less brain activity ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-05-19
  • Gaining Insight to Our Own Desires
    Gaining insight to our own desires takes frequent assessment and the ability to overcome the anxiety to make a change. ... read more
    Source: Anxiety NewsPublished on 2018-05-19
  • Death Anxiety
    People repress the full realization of death and dying and develop various defenses to keep the suppressed material at bay. ... read more
    Source: Anxiety NewsPublished on 2018-05-18
  • The Boundless Life Challenge
    A focus on overall wellness helps to dispel feelings of self-doubt. ... read more
    Source: Anxiety NewsPublished on 2018-05-17
  • Anxiety and the Here and Now
    Leadership development is increasingly focused on the ability to be present in the Here and Now. Why is that so hard? ... read more
    Source: Anxiety NewsPublished on 2018-05-17
  • What’s the Ultimate Psychological Paradox?
    As adults, we’re given various opportunities to cultivate resources that can greatly reduce the intense vulnerability we felt as children. ... read more
    Source: Anxiety NewsPublished on 2018-05-16

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