Psychology News

  • Food Insecurity Linked to Poor Psychological Well-Being
    A new study finds that people who experience food insecurity have a lower quality of life and less psychological well-being. Researchers at the University of Copenhagen say this is the first study on food insecurity in Denmark. Using measurement methods used in the United States, where authorities regularly monitor the ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-01-17
  • Mental Health of New MDs Often Tied to Nature of Internship
    The mental health of new doctors during their first year of residency — called the intern year — may be significantly affected by the nature of the program they enter, according to a new study published in the journal Academic Medicine. A research team from the University of Michigan (U-M) and Medical ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-01-16
  • Leaky Blood Vessels in Brain May Signal Dementia Early On
    Leaky capillaries in the brain may be an early sign of Alzheimer’s disease, according to a new study published in the journal Nature Medicine. These leaky blood vessels, which represent a breakdown of the blood-brain barrier, were consistently linked to cognitive impairment in study participants, regardless of whether the hallmark ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-01-16
  • Fear & Anger May Affect Conservatives and Liberals Differently
    Fear and anger related to the 2016 presidential election and climate change — one of the campaign’s major issues — had different effects on the way conservatives and liberals processed information, according to new research. The study, published in Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, suggest that certain emotional underpinnings of ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-01-15
  • Recalling Happy Memories in Adolescence Can Cut Depression Risk
    In a new study, University of Cambridge researchers found that  recalling positive events and experiences can help young people build resilience against depression in later life. Depression is now the leading cause of disability worldwide, affecting more than 300 million people. The condition often first emerges in adolescence, a ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-01-15
  • Military Wives May Have Greater Risk of Perinatal Depression
    Women whose partners are away on military deployment are at greater risk of developing depression during pregnancy and just after giving birth, according to a new U.K. study published in the Journal of the Royal Army Medical Corps. The findings show that lone parenting can further exacerbate these depressive symptoms, ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-01-15
  • Analytic Model May Better Predict Who Will Develop PTSD
    A newly developed analytic model can predict with significant accuracy which trauma victims are most likely to develop chronic post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The findings are published in the journal World Psychiatry. Since chronic PTSD is so difficult to treat, knowing soon after trauma exposure how likely a survivor is ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-01-14
  • Patient Survey: Many ER Workers Lack Knowledge of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
    In the first known study to look at how chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is handled in the emergency department (ED), researchers found that many health care workers have a profound lack of understanding of the disorder and that most CFS patients do not receive proper care in the ED. The ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-01-14
  • Targeted Cognitive Training Can Aid Those With Severe Schizophrenia
    A new study shows that targeted cognitive training (TCT) benefits patients with severe schizophrenia, improving verbal learning and auditory perception while lessening the severity of auditory hallucinations. Schizophrenia is among the most difficult mental illnesses to treat, according to researchers at the University of California San Diego. One reason is ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-01-13
  • Connection to Nature Can Ease Distress, Hyperactivity in Kids
    A new Hong Kong study, published in the journal PLOS ONE, finds that when preschoolers are connected to nature, they have fewer behavioral and emotional difficulties, show improved prosocial behaviors and are less distressed and hyperactive. Previous research has shown that children who live in areas with less green space may ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-01-13
  • Victims of Bullying, Sexual Abuse Often Have Lower Quality of Life
    Victims of sexual abuse or bullying tend to have a lower quality of life similar to people living with chronic conditions such as heart disease, diabetes, depression or severe anxiety, according to a new Australian study published in the journal BMC Public Health. They are also much more likely to ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-01-13
  • Assessing Psychological Flexibility May Help Tailor Therapy to Individual Patient
    In a new study, U.K. researchers have analyzed degrees of psychological flexibility and identified three distinct classes: high, moderate and low. Delineating psychological flexibility provides clinicians with diagnostic tools with which to create more individual therapeutic solutions, researchers said. Such flexibility is a key part of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT), ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-01-12
  • Excessive Body Fat Around Abdomen Linked to Shrinking Brain
    Carrying extra body fat, especially around the middle of the body, may be linked to brain shrinkage, according to a new study. For the study, researchers determined obesity by measuring body mass index (BMI) and waist-to-hip ratio in study participants. Using magnetic resonance imaging, they then discovered that those with ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-01-12
  • Sex May Initiate Romantic Attachment
    A series of studies suggest that sex can help to initiate romantic relationships between potential partners. Researchers believe sexual desire may provides a magnetism that keeps partners together long enough to form a bond; this bond in turn may enhance childhood survival by reinforcing joint parenting. In the research, psychologists ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-01-11
  • Child Abuse History Tied to Much Higher Risk of Suicide
    Adults with a history of childhood physical, sexual, and/or emotional abuse or neglect are at least two to three times more likely to attempt suicide, according to a new large-scale study conducted by U.K. psychologists at The University of Manchester and the University of South Wales. The researchers analyzed 68 ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-01-11
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