Psychology News

  • Even If Fake News on Facebook Is Flagged As Such, Our Bias Can Make It Skew as True
    With the 2020 presidential election season moving into high gear, many people will get their political news on social media, especially Facebook. But a new study shows that most people can’t trust themselves to figure out what’s true and what’s not when on Facebook. “We all believe that we are better ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-11-09
  • Physical Activity May Ward Off New Episodes of Depression
    People who engage in at least several hours of exercise per week are less likely to be diagnosed with a new episode of depression, even in the face of high genetic risk for the disorder, according to a new study at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). “Our findings strongly suggest that, ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-11-09
  • Poverty, Not Trauma, Appears to Harm Young Refugees’ Working Memory
    In a new study that examined the effects of poverty and trauma on young refugees’ cognitive skills, researchers found that only poverty appears to have lasting effects on working memory. “Our results suggest that the minds of young refugees are under the siege of poverty,” said Kristin Hadfield, assistant professor ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-11-08
  • Borderline Personality Disorder Brings Middle-Age Heart Risks
    Emerging research suggests middle-aged adults who show symptoms of borderline personality disorder should be screened for cardiovascular risks. Investigators discovered that this particular mental health disorder may, in middle age, be linked to physical signs of worsening cardiovascular health. “Although borderline personality disorder is well studied for its relationship to ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-11-08
  • Brief Art Intervention Benefits Caregivers of Cancer Patients
    Oncology professionals and family caregivers of cancer patients who engage in brief art-making interventions may experience reduced levels of stress, anxiety and burnout and an increase in positive emotions, according to a new study published in the European Journal of Oncology Nursing. “Families of cancer patients experience emotional trauma around ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-11-08
  • Exposure to Consumer Product Chemicals While Pregnant Linked to Lower IQ in Children
    New research has found a link between exposure during the first trimester of pregnancy to chemicals found in common consumer products and lower IQ in children by the age of 7. For the study, scientists from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in the U.S. and Karlstad University ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-11-08
  • Internet Gaming Disorder Often Tied to Escapism in Both Recreational, Pro Gamers
    In a first-of-its-kind study, researchers compared professional electronic sport (esport) players to recreational video game players and explored the similarities and differences between what motivates each group. They discovered that while the two groups are psychosocially different, both esport and recreational gamers run the risk of developing internet gaming disorder ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-11-08
  • Smoking May Hike Risk of Depression, Schizophrenia
    A new investigation from the U.K. suggests tobacco smoking may increase the risk of developing depression and schizophrenia. University of Bristol researchers believe the study adds to a growing body of work suggesting that smoking can have adverse effects on mental health. It is well-known that smoking is much more ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-11-07
  • Only-Child Families Tend to Eat Less Healthily
    A new study finds that families with multiple children tend to make healthier eating choices than families with an only-child. The findings, published in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, reveal that only-children, whom researchers refer to as “singletons,” had less healthy family eating practices and beverage choices, and ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-11-07
  • For Successful Gift Giving, It’s All About the Wrapping
    As another holiday gift-giving season begins, a new study has discovered an often overlooked factor that can influence whether the person receiving your gift is pleased — how the gift is wrapped. “When we receive a gift from a friend, we use the wrapping as a cue about the gift ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-11-07
  • Some Mind-Body Therapies May Cut Opioid Use for Pain
    In the first meta-analysis of scientific literature on the role of mind-body therapies in addressing opioid-treated pain, researchers have found that some of these treatments can reduce pain. Moreover, investigators discovered the therapies are associated with reduced opioid use among patients treated with prescription opioids. The study appears in in ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-11-06
  • Helping With Household Chores May Not Improve Kids’ Self-Control
    A new study, published in the Journal of Research in Personality, finds that assigning household chores to kids may not improve their self-control, as many parents believe. Dr. Rodica Damian, an assistant professor of psychology at the University of Houston, admits it was not the finding they expected. “We found ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-11-06
  • Study Probes Link Between Suicide Risk and Many Prescription Drugs
    In a new review, researchers looked at 922 prescription drugs taken by 146 million people over an 11-year period to see how the drugs were linked to suicide attempts. The findings, published in the Harvard Data Science Review, show that 10 of these medications were linked to an increase in ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-11-06
  • Deep Sleep Can Rewire The Anxious Brain
    A sleepless night can trigger up to a 30 percent rise in anxiety levels, while a good night’s sleep tends to stabilize emotions, according to a new study at the University of California (UC), Berkeley. The findings show that the type of sleep most able to calm and reset the ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-11-06
  • Childhood Thinking Skills May Predict Cognition at 70
    How well eight-year-olds perform on a cognitive test may help predict how well they score on tests of thinking and memory when they are 70 years old, according to a new study published in the journal Neurology. For example, a person whose cognitive performance was in the top 25 percent ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-11-05
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