Psychology News

  • PTSD May Hike Long-Term Health Risks in 9/11 Clean-Up Crews
    A new study finds that post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) may increase the long-term risk for stroke and heart attack among many of those who helped clear debris after the World Trade Center attack in 2001. The new report is the first to come from World Trade Center-Heart, a study investigating ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-07-11
  • Vitamin D May Not Protect from Dementia, Alzheimer’s After All
    Australian scientists have failed to find evidence that vitamin D can act as a protective neurological agent. The findings are contrary to suggestions that higher levels of vitamin D can provide protection from brain disorders. Researchers found that vitamin D, necessary for healthy living, is unlikely to protect individuals from ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-07-11
  • Virtual Reality May Aid Cognition for Those With Low Self-Esteem
    New research suggests a virtual reality experience can enhance the intellectual performance of those with low self-esteem. University of Barcelona researchers used a virtual reality simulation to allow people to have the perception of being in Albert Einstein’s body. Following the “Einstein” experience, participants were less likely to unconsciously stereotype ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-07-10
  • Parents with Severe Childhood Trauma More Likely to Have Kids with Behavior Issues
    Parents who faced severe trauma and stress in their own childhood are more likely to see  behavioral health problems in their children, according to a new study published in the journal Pediatrics. The childhood hardships included in the study were as follows: divorce or separation of parents; death of or ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-07-10
  • Oxygen Therapy May Reduce Dementia Risk in COPD Patients
    Breathing in extra oxygen enhances blood vessel function in the brains of people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), according to a new study published in the journal Experimental Physiology. The findings show why oxygen therapy may help reduce incidence of dementia among patients with lung disease. COPD is a ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-07-09
  • Brain Injury Survivors Who Become Obese Face Greater Risk for Chronic Illness
    Being overweight or obese is linked to a greater risk for chronic diseases among survivors of moderate to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI), particularly over time, according to a new study published in the Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation (JHTR). The findings emphasize the need for a proactive approach to ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-07-08
  • Boosting Folic Acid May Lead to Less Risk of Severe Mental Illness
    Fortifying grain-based foods with folic acid — instituted in the U.S. in the 1990s to prevent neural tube defects in infants — may also reduce the incidence of severe mental illnesses like schizophrenia that initially appear in young adulthood, according to new research. In a study comparing brain images of ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-07-08
  • ‘Skinny Fat’ Pairing May Predict Cognitive Skills in Older Adults
    A new study has found low muscle mass and strength in the context of high fat mass may be an important predictor of cognitive performance in older adults. Investigators call the combination of less muscle plus high fat  “skinny fat.” While sarcopenia, the loss of muscle tissue that is part of ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-07-08
  • Study Probes Circadian Rhythm Genes for Alzheimer’s Clues
    A certain gene variant previously implicated in employees with a poor tolerance to shift work may also be tied to a greater risk for Alzheimer’s disease in the elderly, according to a new Finnish study. The findings are published in the journal SLEEP. Alzheimer’s disease is a brain disorder that ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-07-08
  • Depression, Anxiety Tied to Worse Outcomes in Heart Failure Patients
    Heart failure patients who suffer from depression and anxiety are at greater risk of progressive heart disease and other adverse outcomes, according to a new study published in the Harvard Review of Psychiatry. In addition, healthy individuals with depression are more likely to develop heart failure. Heart failure is a ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-07-07
  • People Who Feel Younger Than Their Age Show Less Signs of Brain Aging
    A new study has found that elderly people who do not feel their age show fewer signs of brain aging. Using MRI scans, researchers found that those feelings — known as subjective age — translate into fewer signs of brain aging compared to people who feel their age or feel ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-07-07
  • Mindfulness May Ease Tinnitus Symptoms
    New research has found that a mindfulness-based approach to tinnitus could transform treatment of the condition. Led by Dr. Laurence McKenna from University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust (UCLH) and Dr. Liz Marks from the Department of Psychology at the University of Bath, the new study found that mindfulness ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-07-07
  • Nature Exposure Tied to Wide Range of Health Benefits
    Spending time in nature is associated with a wide range of significant health benefits, according to a new study by researchers at the University of East Anglia in England. The findings, published in the journal Environmental Research, reveal that exposure to nature may increase sleep duration, lower stress and reduce the ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-07-07
  • Study: Not All Aggressive Behavior is Bullying
    A new paper published in the Journal of Child and Family Studies asserts that general aggressive behavior and bullying are not the same thing. While all aggressive behaviors are meant to cause harm, bullying is a repetitive behavior characterized by a distinct imbalance of power. “It’s important for us to ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-07-06
  • Many Ex-Smokers Crave Lost Social Identity
    Many ex-smokers begin smoking again because they want to recapture a sense of lost social identity, according to new British research published in the Journal of Substance Use. In fact, according to the findings, many smokers experience quitting as a “loss.” “Although many people do manage to quit, relapse is ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-07-06
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