Psychology News

  • Good Heart Health at 50 May Mean Lower Dementia Risk Later
    Good cardiovascular health at age 50 is linked to a reduced risk of dementia later in life, according to a new study of British adults published in The BMJ journal. Dementia is a progressive disease that can start to develop 15 to 20 years before any noticeable symptoms appear, so ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-08-18
  • Parental Stress During Pregnancy May Impact Kids’ Behavior as Toddlers
    Expectant parents’ emotional struggles are linked to emotional and behavioral issues in toddlers, according to a new study led by the University of Cambridge in the UK. The researchers say their findings highlight a pressing need for greater support for couples before, during and after pregnancy to improve outcomes for ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-08-18
  • Where You Live May Factor Into Premature Death
    A new Canadian study finds that people living in neighborhoods with unhealthy environments (such as fewer trees and more pollution), reduced access to cancer screening and lower total income levels are at greater risk of premature death. The findings are published in the journal Health and Place. For the study, ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-08-18
  • Effects of Testosterone On Moral Reasoning: It’s Complicated
    Although some studies have linked high levels of testosterone to immoral behavior, a new study has found that testosterone supplements actually made people more sensitive to moral norms. This suggests that testosterone’s influence on behavior is more complicated than previously thought, according to researchers at the University of Texas at ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-08-18
  • Elder Financial Abuse Committed More Often by Family Than Strangers
    A new study finds that the elderly are more likely to be financially abused by relatives than by strangers, despite the large number of Internet, mail and telephone scams directed at older adults. “We expected to find that financial abuse was the most common abuse reported,” said Gali Weissberger, Ph.D., ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-08-18
  • Study: Trans College Students Far More Likely to Have Mental Health Issues
    A new study has found that gender minority students, whose gender identity differs from the sex assigned them at birth, are between two and four times more likely to experience mental health problems than their peers. “There has never been a more important time for colleges and universities to take ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-08-18
  • Marijuana Can Boost Risks of Drinking Alcohol
    A new study has discovered that people who use alcohol and marijuana simultaneously were more likely to drink heavier and more often. They were also more likely to experience alcohol-related problems, such as impulsive actions they later regretted, according to researchers at Penn State. “The results suggest that individuals who ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-08-17
  • New Tech Methods to Combat Online Domestic Abuse
    Researchers have developed a new tool to systematically and effectively detect online abuse and then take remedial action to protect victims. Working with the New York City Mayor’s Office to End Domestic and Gender-Based Violence, Cornell Tech researchers created and piloted a questionnaire, a spyware scanning tool and a diagram ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-08-17
  • Bullying Linked To More Suicide Attempts By Young Adolescents
    Being bullied may increase the risk of suicide attempts among young adolescents by approximately three times worldwide, according to a new study. “Globally, approximately 67,000 adolescents die of suicide each year and identifying modifiable risk factors for adolescent suicide is a public health priority,” said lead author Ai Koyanagi, M.D., ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-08-17
  • Frailty Called a Medical Condition, Not an Inevitable Result of Aging
    Frailty — the feeling of being weak, fragile, and having low energy — is not an inevitable part of aging; it is a medical condition all on its own, according to a new study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) Network Open. Frailty is tied to ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-08-16
  • Veterans With Traumatic Brain Injury More Than Twice as Likely to Die by Suicide
    Military veterans with a history of traumatic brain injury (TBI) are more than twice as likely to die by suicide compared to veterans without a TBI diagnosis, according to a new study appearing in the Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation. In addition, among all veterans who died by suicide, the ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-08-16
  • Study Finds Cheating for Monetary Gain is a Character Trait
    A new study answers the question of whether cheating is a product of circumstances or a character trait. To do this, researchers at Texas A&M University and the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute looked at cheating during periods of economic abundance and scarcity to see if cheating for monetary gain is a ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-08-16
  • Black Students Receive Fewer Behavior Warnings From Teachers
    Black middle school students are significantly less likely than their white peers to receive verbal or written warnings from their teachers regarding behavioral misconduct, according to a new University of Illinois study of racial and ethnic disparities in school discipline. “While at first glance, disparities in teacher warnings seem less ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-08-16
  • Virtual Reality Body Swapping an Effective Tool for Talking Through Issues
    It is common for a person to be much better at giving useful advice to a friend in trouble than they are in dealing with their own problems. Researchers explain that although we usually have continuous internal dialogue, we become trapped inside our own way of thinking with our own ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-08-16
  • Mental Health Intervention Reduces Burnout, Stress in Trauma Social Workers
    A new study finds that a mental health intervention for social service workers called Caregivers Journey of Hope can help relieve the stress, trauma and burnout social workers may be experiencing while helping residents heal from a community disaster. The findings are published in Traumatology: An International Journal. There’s a ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-08-16
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