Psychology News

  • New User-Friendly Apps Can Help Older Adults Manage Mental Issues
      In a new study, researchers showed that the use of a smartphone application can transform the delivery of geriatric psychiatry by integrating medical and psychiatric self-management intervention. Experts explain that care of middle-aged and older patients with serious mental illness is complicated. Often these patients suffer from other medical ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-08-16
  • Study Finds Work is Intense and Emotionally Exhausting for Most US Workers
    New research confirms what many Americans already know – that their jobs are hard and draining, and it is difficult to separate work from home. The new study finds that workers frequently face unstable work schedules, unpleasant and potentially hazardous working conditions, and an often hostile social environment. The findings stem ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-08-15
  • For Many Couples, Coke vs Pepsi Can Impact Relationship
    New research suggests that when partners prefer different consumer brands — say you prefer Diet Coke and your partner likes Diet Pepsi — relationship quality may be impacted. In fact, Duke University investigators believe preferring different brands can affect our happiness in relationships more than shared interests or personality traits. “People ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-08-15
  • ‘Smiley’ Emojis in Formal Work Emails May be Frowned Upon
    A new study reveals that smiley-face emojis and similar emoticons in professional e-mails may not create a positive impression and may even affect the receiver’s willingness to share work-related information. “Our findings provide first-time evidence that, contrary to actual smiles, smileys do not increase perceptions of warmth and actually decrease ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-08-15
  • Are Unpleasant Emotions Part of Happiness?
    A new study suggests it is okay if we are not always happy. In fact, investigators discovered life satisfaction is a product of experiencing both negative and positive emotions. In an international study, researchers discovered people may be happier when they feel the emotions they desire, even if those emotions ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-08-15
  • Bumper Stickers Can Incite Emotions & Cognitive Interplay
    A new research effort suggests bumper stickers engage social communication by stimulating drivers and passengers to interact. The premise challenges traditional theory that views freeways and other superhighways as “non-places of negligible social interaction,” where drivers pass each other at high speeds, stop infrequently and are otherwise largely insulated from ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-08-14
  • Transgender TV Characters May Impact Audience Attitudes
    People who watch transgender characters on television tend to have more positive attitudes toward both transgender people and related policies, according to a new study at the University of Southern California (USC), Annenberg. The findings show that watching a fictional story may influence people’s attitudes more than exposure to transgender issues ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-08-14
  • Breaking Gender Roles May Challenge Mental Health
    Emerging research out of the University of Illinois suggests that some mothers’ and fathers’ psychological well-being may suffer when their work and family identities — and the amount of financial support they provide — conflict with conventional gender roles. Researchers found that when women’s paychecks increased to compose the majority of their ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-08-14
  • School-Based Mental Health Programs Reach Large Numbers of Kids
    New findings published in the Harvard Review of Psychiatry show that school-based mental health programs can reach large numbers of children and effectively improve mental health and related outcomes. Approximately 13 percent of children and teens worldwide have significant mental health problems including anxiety, disruptive behavior disorders, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-08-13
  • Study Probes What Happens When People Hear Voices
    A new study has discovered that people who hear voices — both with and without a diagnosed psychotic illness — are more sensitive than other people to a 125-year-old experiment designed to induce hallucinations. And the subjects’ ability to learn that these hallucinations were not real may help pinpoint those in ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-08-13
  • Maternal Inflammation Can Affect Fetal Brain Development
    New research shows that increased levels of inflammatory markers during pregnancy can lead to changes in fetal brain development which, in turn, may increase the child’s risk of developing psychiatric disorders. The incidence of impaired impulse control — the cardinal symptom of these disorders — appears to be particularly affected by this ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-08-13
  • New Imagination Strategies May Boost Memory
    Imagining an action/consequence relationship between two random objects may help you improve your memory, according to a new Canadian study published in the journal Memory & Cognition. For example, if today’s forecast calls for rain, and you want to make sure you remember an umbrella, try to imagine the umbrella ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-08-13
  • Brain Markers May Impact Widespread Pain
    Does widespread pain stem from the brain? A new study suggests it does. Pain is the most common reason people seek medical care, according to the National Institutes of Health. “Sometimes we can easily pinpoint what is causing a person pain,” said Richard Harris, Ph.D., associate professor of anesthesiology and rheumatology ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-08-12
  • Older Adults Need More Follow-Up after ER Screenings for Suicide
    Nearly half of adults over the age of 70 who committed suicide visited an emergency room in the year before their death. However, when healthcare providers see older adults in the emergency room, some may be too quick to assume that the warning signs for suicide are just a natural ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-08-12
  • High-Income Individuals More Likely to Be ‘Weekend Warriors’
    Overall, people with higher incomes tend to be slightly more sedentary than those with low incomes, but many try to make up for it with rigorous exercise a few days a week — the so-called “weekend warrior.” The findings are published in the journal Preventive Medicine. Prior research has found that ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-08-12
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