Psychology News

  • Older, Poor Adults at Greater Risk of Dementia
    Older adults living in poverty have an increased risk of developing dementia, according to a new U.K. study published in JAMA Psychiatry. For the study, researchers from the University College London (UCL) analyzed the data of more than 6,000 English adults born between 1902 and 1943 and found that the ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-05-19
  • Poll: Nearly 9 in 10 Americans See Gun Violence as Public Health Threat
    A new national poll recently released by the American Psychiatric Association (APA) reveals that a large majority of Americans, both Democrats and Republicans, see gun safety as a major public health issue and believe that Congress should do more to address the issue of mass shootings. “This poll reflects Americans’ ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-05-18
  • Male Depression Tied to Reduced Chance of Pregnancy
    Among couples in treatment for infertility, major depression in the male partner is related to a 60 percent reduced chance of pregnancy and live birth, according to a new study published in the journal Fertility and Sterility. Depression in the female partner did not appear to lower pregnancy odds or ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-05-18
  • Specific Brain Abnormality Tied to Risk of Mental Illness
    A specific brain abnormality may indicate a person’s general risk for mental illness, according to a new study at Duke University. The signature abnormality involves a reduced efficiency between the brain’s visual areas and certain networks important for integrating sensory information and suppressing distracting information. This reduced efficiency is found ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-05-18
  • Study: Suicidal Thoughts, Attempts Among Kids Doubled in 7 Years
    New research finds the number of school-age children and adolescents hospitalized for suicidal thoughts or attempts has more than doubled from 2008 to 2015. Seasonal trends and gender variations were also discovered. The study looked at trends in emergency room and inpatient encounters for suicide ideation and attempts in children ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-05-17
  • Many Psychiatry Residents Unprepared to Deal with Opioid Crisis
    Many incoming psychiatry residents express a troubling lack of knowledge on how to diagnose and address opioid use disorder (OUD), and a vast majority are asking for formal training to help guide them through the current epidemic, according to new findings from the first wave of a cross-sectional survey of ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-05-17
  • Argument with Spouse Can Worsen Pain in Osteoarthritis, Diabetes Patients
    Fighting with a spouse can worsen pain in people with chronic conditions, such as arthritis or diabetes, according to a new study published in the journal Annals of Behavioral Medicine. The findings show that in two groups of older individuals — one group with arthritis and one with diabetes — those who ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-05-16
  • Many Anxiety, Depression Patients May Have Chronic Thyroid Illness
    German researchers have discovered a significant link between autoimmune thyroiditis (AIT), also known as Hashimoto’s disease, and depression and anxiety disorders. In fact, patients with AIT may account for more than 40 percent of all cases of depression and 30 percent of all cases of anxiety, according to the findings. ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-05-16
  • Exergaming May Slow Cognitive Decline
    New research finds that exergaming can help older adults with mild memory impairment improve their complex thinking and memory skills. Exergames are defined as video games that also require physical exercise. The finding is important because mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is often a precursor to Alzheimer’s disease among older adults. ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-05-16
  • Too Many Extracurricular Activities for Kids May Do More Harm Than Good
    A new study suggests that parents should be mindful of how much time their children are spending in extracurricular activities, such as music lessons and sports clubs. The findings, published in the journal Sport, Education and Society, unveil the pressing social demand for kids to be involved in organized activities, ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-05-15
  • Older Workers Report More Stress When Employer Support Falls Short
    In a new study, Portland State University investigators discovered age appears to matter as older workers report more stress than younger workers when a lack of support is perceived. Researchers surveyed 243 municipal public works employees between the ages of 24 and 64 over the course of a year. They ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-05-15
  • Dark Chocolate May Ease Stress, Boost Mood & Immunity
    Eating dark chocolate with a high concentration of cacao could have a positive effect on stress levels, inflammation, mood, memory and immunity, according to two new preliminary studies recently presented at the Experimental Biology 2018 annual meeting in San Diego. Cacao is a major source of flavonoids, extremely potent antioxidants and ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-05-14
  • Depressed, Controlling Parents May Play Role in Breakup of Child’s Friendships
    A new study sheds light on why childhood friendships fall apart and is the first to show that parents, particularly those with mental health problems, often play a role in these friendship breakups. The findings, published in the Journal of Family Psychology, show that among children with clinically depressed parents, ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-05-13
  • Opioid Meds Act on Different Receptors Than Body’s Opioids
    In a new study, researchers discovered that pharmaceutical opioids produce their effects by binding to receptors inside neurons; this is contrary to previous theories that these drugs acted only on the same surface receptors as the body’s natural endogenous opioids. This difference between how medically used and naturally made opioids ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-05-13
  • Discrimination Can Affect Latinas’ Satisfaction with Birth Control Services
    Experiences of everyday discrimination, inside or outside medical settings, can take a significant toll on Latina women’s comfort with reproductive health services, according to a new study published in the journal Women’s Health Issues. The findings show that young Latina women who have experienced racial or ethnic discrimination are less ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-05-13
No feed items found.

Experience Freedom in Your Life