Psychology News

  • Spiritual Upbringing Tied to Better Physical, Mental Health in Adulthood
    Participating in spiritual practices during childhood and adolescence may help buffer against a number of negative health outcomes in early adulthood, according to a new study published in the American Journal of Epidemiology. Researchers at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health found that people who attended weekly religious services ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-09-15
  • Childhood Trauma Tied to Greater Social Dysfunction in Adults with Major Mental Illness
    Childhood trauma is tied to impaired social cognition in adults diagnosed with major psychiatric disorders, according to a new Irish study published in the journal European Psychiatry. ‘Social cognition’ is a psychology term related to how people process and apply information regarding other people and social interactions. It focuses on ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-09-14
  • Can You Spot Dishonesty in a Politician’s Face?
    We’re often told not to judge a book by its cover, but a new study published in the journal Psychological Science finds that some first impressions about honesty may be correct. Researchers at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) found that people are very good at detecting an unknown politician’s ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-09-14
  • Study: ADHD May Hike Risk of Later Parkinson’s, Other Disorders
    Emerging research suggests attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder patients may have an increased risk of developing Parkinson’s and Parkinson-like diseases than those with no ADHD history. University of Utah researchers said the long-term health effects of having ADHD and use of common ADHD medications are an understudied area. The research void is ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-09-13
  • How Losing a Mom Early Impacts Religiosity
    Teenagers who lose a religious mother to an untimely death are less likely to attend church as young adults, while teens who lose a non-religious mom are more likely to seek the comfort of spiritual practices, especially prayer. Researcher Renae Wilkinson, sociologist and doctoral candidate at Baylor University’s College of ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-09-12
  • Naturally Mindful People May Feel Less Pain
    A new study published in the journal Pain reveals that naturally mindful people may feel less pain than non-mindful people. Mindfulness is the ability to focus on the present moment without too much emotional reaction or judgment. Researchers at Wake Forest School of Medicine in North Carolina looked at data pulled ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-09-12
  • Our First Impressions May Be Better Than We Think
    While the importance of making a favorable first impression is widely acknowledged, new research suggests we often undervalue that impact. In fact, after talking with new people, our conversation partners like us and enjoy our company more than we think. Investigators explain that in our social lives, we’re constantly engaged ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-09-12
  • Survey: 1 in 5 College Students Stressed, Considers Suicide
    A new survey reveals that while college years may be a time of excitement and optimism they are also often stressful. And, the stress is accompanied by increased mental health diagnoses and the risk of suicide or suicidal thoughts. Brigham and Women’s hospital investigators queried more than 67,000 college students ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-09-11
  • Gut-Based Decisions Often Held with Stronger Conviction
    A new study published in the journal Emotion shows that we tend to see our gut-based decisions as truer reflections of ourselves and are more likely to hold them with greater conviction than decisions we make through careful deliberation. “We offer what we believe to be a novel and unique ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-09-11
  • Tendency for Risk-Taking or Anxiety May Be Found in Hippocampal Cells
    People are quite different when it comes to trying dangerous or exhilarating things. Until now, however, the neural mechanism underlying this risk-taking behavior has remained largely unknown. In a new study, neuroscientists from Uppsala University in Sweden and the Brain Institute of the Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-09-10
  • Excessive Daytime Sleepiness Linked to Increased Risk for Alzheimer’s
    A new study shows that older adults who report being very sleepy during the day were nearly three times more likely to have brain deposits of beta amyloid, a protein that’s a hallmark for Alzheimer’s disease, years later. The long-term study, published in the journal SLEEP, adds to the evidence ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-09-09
  • Smiling Often Driven by Feeling of Engagement, Social or Not
    It is widely assumed that we smile because we are happy, and/or that it is a natural response to interacting with other living beings. While these are often the case, U.K. researchers at Brighton and Sussex Medical School (BSMS) found that smiling may stem from another source. They discovered ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-09-09
  • Top Female Athletes with Abuse History at Greater Risk of Physical Injury
    A new Swedish study finds that elite female athletes with a history of sexual or physical abuse face a much greater risk of injury compared to those without a history of abuse. Earlier in 2018, the Athletics Research Center at Linköping University published a report commissioned by the Swedish Athletics ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-09-09
  • Rapid Weight Gain in Infancy May Hike Obesity Risk in Kids with Autism
    Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are more likely to become obese compared to their typically developing peers. But until now, it has remained unclear why ASD children are at greater risk for developing obesity. In a new study, researchers at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing (Penn Nursing) ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-09-08
  • Cannabis Use Linked to ‘Noisy’ Brain
    New research shows that cannabis users experience increased cortical activation during the brain’s resting state. The resulting “noisy brain” could impair brain activity and disrupt cognitive processes, according Dr. Shikha Prashad, the study’s lead author and a research scientist at the Center for BrainHealth at The University of Texas at ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-09-08
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