Psychology News

  • Researchers Develop Tool to Measure Quality of Life in People with Autism
    A set of simple questionnaires can help clinicians and families better evaluate the quality of life for people diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), according to a new study led by researchers at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP). The new measurement tool is designed for people of all ages on ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-03-27
  • People Rate Their Bodies as More Attractive When Viewed From Outsider’s Perspective
    Are we the best at judging our own attractiveness? New research shows we aren’t. For a new study, researchers at the Experimental Virtual Environments (EVENT) Lab at the University of Barcelona in Spain examined the difference between how we believe we look and how we view our own body from ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-03-25
  • Inconsistent Bedtimes Can Hike Risk for Illness
    New research suggests that going to bed at inconsistent times can elevate resting heart rate and, subsequently, the risk for cardiovascular disease. The finding comes at a time when getting a good night’s rest can be challenging. We live in a world that’s always “on” — responding to emails at ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-03-25
  • Anxious About COVID-19? Prolonged Stress Can Impact Male Fertility, Offspring
    Prolonged stress and fear driven by trying situations, such as the coronavirus pandemic, not only take a toll on mental health, but may also have a long-term impact on male sperm composition which could affect future children, according to new research conducted with mice and humans. “There are so many ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-03-24
  • Childhood Obesity Tied to Higher Risk of Anxiety, Depression, Premature Death
    Two new studies show that children with obesity have a three times higher risk of mortality in early adulthood and are more likely to suffer from anxiety and depression. The findings highlight the need to identify specific risk factors for children with obesity and find preventative tools, according to researchers ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-03-23
  • ADHD Drugs Cause Brain to Focus on Benefits of Work, Not the Costs
    It has long been assumed that stimulant drugs, such as Ritalin and Adderall, work by helping people focus. Now a new study, published in the journal Science, shows that these medications, typically prescribed for those with attention-deficit/ hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), actually work by directing the brain to fix its attention ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-03-23
  • Mental Stress May Predict 2nd Heart Attack or Dying from Heart Disease
    For some people who survive a heart attack, mental stress may be a stronger predictor of a repeat heart attack or dying from heart disease than physical stress, according to new research. Traditional stress tests, in which someone exercises on a treadmill or takes a medicine that makes the heart ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-03-22
  • Ohio Study IDs Those at Highest Risk for Opioid Addiction
    A research team, led by the University of Cincinnati, looked at Ohio Health Department records from 2010 to 2017 to help identify the populations at greatest risk of opioid overdose. The findings, published in the journal Scientific Reports, show that white men between the ages of 30 and 39 are ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-03-22
  • How Users Probe Fake News Online – Or Not
    Facebook and Twitter provide us with a lot of information, but it’s getting harder and harder to tell what’s real and what’s not. Researchers at the University of Washington wanted to know how people investigated potentially suspicious posts on their own feeds. The researchers watched 25 participants scroll through their ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-03-21
  • Language of Online Health Forums Affect Credibility, Trust
    Health forum articles that use more neutral language, rather than containing many positive adjectives, are deemed to be more trustworthy by the public, according to a new German study at the University of Münster. These days, Internet health forums are often the first place people seek out information regarding a ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-03-21
  • Too Little Or Too Much Sleep May Be Linked to Heart Risks
    People who get around seven or eight hours of sleep per night, as opposed to less or more,  have significantly less evidence of stiffness in their arteries, indicating a reduced risk for heart disease or a stroke, according to a new study presented at the American College of Cardiology’s Annual ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-03-21
  • Public Health Leadership Vital to Slowing Coronavirus Pandemic
    In a new commentary, medical experts emphasize the urgent need for strong public health leadership in the wake of the emerging coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. “Appropriate concerns and not fear should play a major role in the emerging pandemic, and public health efforts should focus on public health issues, not political ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-03-20
  • Minorities, Poor People More Likely to See Racism, Poverty as Environmental Issues
    In a new survey of more than 1,100 U.S. residents, Cornell researchers discovered that racial and ethnic minorities and lower-income people consider racism and poverty to be environmental issues. “You could go out and talk about climate change and invasive species, but those might not be what really counts as ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-03-20
  • Older Children’s Brains Respond Differently at Different Times of Day, Leading to Risky Behavior at Night
    Older children respond more strongly to rewarding experiences and less strongly to negative experiences later in the day, which may lead to poor decision-making at night, according to a new study. “When children transition into adolescence, they begin to chase rewards/pleasing experiences more and respond to losses/punishment less. How responsive ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-03-20
  • Teens’ Chronic Negative Thinking Can Lead to Sleep Deprivation, Depression
    New research suggests that rumination or persistent negative thinking associated with perfectionism can keep teenagers awake at night and increase their chance of becoming depressed and anxious. Australian researchers performed an online study of almost 400 adolescents aged 14 to 20 years that assessed difficulty initiating sleep, repetitive negative thinking, ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-03-19
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