Psychology News

  • Repeated Exposure to Stigma May Reduce Brain’s Reward Sensitivity
    In a new study, researchers from the University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB) investigated how negative stereotype exposure over time may affect the brain’s sensitivity to rewards. The findings, published in the journal Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience, reveal that the brains of Mexican-American students exposed to subtle negative stereotypes ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-07-08
  • New System Shown to Improve Early Diagnosis of Autism
    Researchers at Indiana University School of Medicine have developed a new system to screen and evaluate children for autism spectrum disorders. The primary care-driven system will be implemented statewide with a goal of determining if a children has an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) at an earlier age. A 2020 report ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-07-08
  • Night Owl Teens at Greater Risk for Asthma, Allergies
    A new study shows that asthma and allergies are more common among teens who prefer to stay up late and wake later in the morning, compared to those who sleep and wake earlier. Asthma symptoms are known to be strongly linked to the body’s internal clock, but this study is ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-07-07
  • Walking Near Water Can Boost Mood, Well-Being
    A new Spanish study shows that taking short, frequent walks along blue spaces — areas that prominently feature water, such as beaches, lakes, rivers or fountains — appears to have a positive effect on people’s mental health, mood and vitality. Several studies have demonstrated the health benefits of walking in ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-07-07
  • Having a Pet Dog Linked to Improved Social-Emotional Development in Young Children
    Young children who grow up in households with a pet dog have better social and emotional wellbeing than children from households that do not own a dog, according to new research. For the new study, a team of researchers at the University of Western Australia and Telethon Kids Institute at Perth ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-07-06
  • Infant Sleep Issues May Predict Teen Mental Health Disorders
    Emerging research from the UK suggests that specific sleep problems among babies and very young children can be linked to mental disorders in adolescence. Experts say the study findings support existing evidence that insomnia can contribute to psychosis and borderline personality disorders. For the study, investigators at the University of ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-07-06
  • Using Marijuana While Pregnant Boosts Risk of Sleep Problems for Children
    A new study warns pregnant women that if they use marijuana, their child is more likely to suffer sleep problems as much as a decade later. Published in Sleep Health: The Journal of The National Sleep Foundation, the study is the latest to link prenatal cannabis use to developmental problems ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-07-06
  • School Absenteeism Tied to Adult Struggles
    A new study suggests that children who miss a lot of school from kindergarten to eighth grade may face unexpected struggles as young adults. The findings, published in the Journal of Youth and Adolescence, show that young adults who had missed a lot of school in childhood were less likely ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-07-05
  • Playtime with Dad May Improve Child’s Self-Control
    Emerging research suggests that beginning father-child playtime at a very young age may help kids better control their behavior and emotions as they grow up. In the study, investigators from University of Cambridge and the LEGO Foundation reviewed fragmentary evidence from the past 40 years to understand more about how ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-07-05
  • How Ritual Impacts the Brain To Help Ease Anxiety
    In a new study, researchers from the University of Connecticut looked at how rituals such as weddings, birthday parties, annual parades and the like may play a role in reducing our anxiety levels. The mechanism behind this may be that rituals provide the brain with a sense of structure, regularity ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-07-05
  • Mouse Study Reveals Brown Fat’s Role in Stress-Induced Inflammation
    It is well-documented that acute psychological stress can lead to inflammation, but the mechanisms behind this reaction have remained unclear. Now in a new mouse study, Yale researchers reveal that this inflammatory process may originate in brown fat cells. The findings are published in the journal Cell. Since stress hormones ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-07-04
  • What Makes Your Neighborhood Great May Be All in Your Head
    A new study has found that what makes people happy with their neighborhoods has almost nothing to do with the neighborhood itself. “It’s all in our heads,” said Zachary Neal, an associate professor of psychology at Michigan State University and author of the study. “Contrary to what many would think, ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-07-04
  • Nearly Half of US Teens Stalked or Harassed by Partners
    A new study suggests adolescent relationships often include being stalked or harassed by a partner. Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) researchers discovered 48% of 12 to 18-year-olds who have been in a relationship have been stalked or harassed by a partner, and 42% have stalked or harassed a ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-07-04
  • People With Insecure Attachment Styles More Likely to Play ‘Hard-to-Get’
    Who is most likely to play hard-to-get? A new study, published in the journal Personality and Individual Differences, investigated the psychological underpinnings of making yourself seem more desirable by withholding obvious signs of romantic interest. Overall, the researchers found that women and people with insecure attachment styles were more likely ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-07-04
  • Tips on How to Have a Better Day During the Pandemic
    It’s no surprise that people are feeling more stressed, anxious, lonely and depressed during the COVID-19 pandemic. But there are some people who are not just doing okay, but are feeling gratitude for what they have and finding joy in the small things. A new survey by researchers at the ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-07-03
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