Psychology News

  • Hiding True Self at Work Reduces Job Satisfaction, Sense of Belonging
    Hiding your true self at work can harm your career and reduce your sense of belonging among co-workers, according to a new study led by the University of Exeter in England. Researchers investigated commonly stigmatized traits — being lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender (LGBT), or having a history of poverty or ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-06-22
  • Night Owls May Find It Harder to Control OCD
    New research finds the time a person goes to bed can influence their perceived ability to control obsessive thoughts. Investigators from Binghamton University, State University of New York, monitored 20 individuals diagnosed with OCD and 10 endorsing sub-threshold OCD symptoms during one week of sleep. The research was led by Dr. Meredith ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-06-21
  • Adults with Separation Anxiety May Be Vulnerable to ‘Going Home’ Ads
    Adults who experience separation anxiety are more susceptible to marketing themes that play on emotions surrounding home life, according to a new study published in the Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology. Adult separation anxiety disorder (ASAD) is a mental health condition characterized by excessive anxiety in response to being ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-06-21
  • New Tool Helps Predict Cognitive Deficits in Parkinson’s
    Although Parkinson’s disease (PD) is typically thought of as a movement disorder, approximately 25 percent of patients also experience cognitive deficits. A newly developed research tool may help predict a patient’s risk for developing dementia and could enable clinical trials aimed at finding treatments to prevent the cognitive effects of the ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-06-21
  • Teaching Kids Mental Health Skills Can Ease Anxiety, Suicidal Thoughts
    A new Canadian pilot program designed to promote mental health skills in youth significantly lessened cases of depression, anxiety and suicidal thoughts. University of Alberta researchers led the EMPATHY program in a local school district from 2013 to 2015. The program was offered to more than 6,000 youth in grades ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-06-21
  • Study: 2 of 3 Moms of Young Kids ‘Shamed’ about Parenting Skills
    A new study finds that nearly two-thirds of mothers of young children have been criticized about their parenting skills, often by someone within their own family. Researchers say such disapproval may limit the time a mom and her child spend with her own family and that moms need support, not ridicule. ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-06-20
  • Healthy Diet Plus Mental and Physical Exercise Can Reduce Elder Frailty
    Aging is often accompanied by weakness, difficulty walking, and declining cognition. This frailty results in adverse health outcomes including disability, hospitalization, and mortality. A new study from the National University of Singapore (NUS) finds that among frail elders, good nutrition, physical training, and mental exercises can reverse many of the ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-06-20
  • Growing Evidence of Link Between Gut Bacteria, Autism
    A new review of more than 150 research papers reveals that scientists have been reporting links between the composition of gut bacteria and autistic behaviors since the 1960’s. Many of these studies suggest that restoring a healthy balance in gut bacteria can treat symptoms of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-06-20
  • Relationship Anxiety May Hinder Long-Term Bond
    Emerging research finds that uncertainty over a relationship may be detrimental to the long-term success of the relationship. While some degree of uncertainty – the “love me, love me not” concern – is normal at the beginning of a relationship, persistent attachment anxiety is problematic. In the study, Florida State ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-06-20
  • Passive Smoking in Childhood Can Hike Risk of Arthritis in Adult Smokers
    A new study confirms the link between active smoking and the risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis (RA). It also suggests, for the first time, that smokers who had early life exposure to tobacco through passive smoking have a significantly increased risk for developing the disease. RA is the most common ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-06-19
  • Some Brain Neurons May Help Distinguish Reality from Imagination
    Neurons in the lateral prefrontal cortex, a region of the brain found to be abnormal in psychosis, are also important in helping people distinguish between reality and imagination, according to a recent study published in the journal Nature Communications. The researchers looked at how the brain codes visual information in ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-06-19
  • Preschool Skills to Manage Emotions Important to Reduce Obesity
    Emerging research suggests self-management skills to learn how to cope with the environment and manage emotions should begin during preschool years. Investigators found the skills are important because when children fail to learn effective self-regulation skills during those early critical years, studies have shown they may be at a ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-06-19
  • Should Parents Support a Child’s Negative Emotions?
    Parenting is not an easy task. One challenging area of parental involvement is the response to a child’s emotional state, particularly when a child is sad. New research suggests that when mothers support their children’s negative emotions, surprisingly, these same children appear less socially adjusted when rated by teachers. ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-06-19
  • Acupuncture Shown to Ease Pain in ER Patients
    A new study has found that the use of acupuncture in emergency departments is a safe and effective alternative to pain-relieving drugs for some patients. Led by RMIT University in Melbourne, Australia, the study found acupuncture was as effective as pain medicine in providing long-term relief for patients who came ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-06-18
  • Meditation, Yoga Can Reverse DNA Stress Reactions
    Mind-body interventions (MBIs), such as meditation, yoga and tai chi, don’t just  relax us. According to a new study, they can reverse the molecular reactions in our DNA that cause ill health and depression. The research, published in the journal Frontiers in Immunology, reviews over a decade of studies analyzing ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-06-18
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