Psychology News

  • Siblings of Kids With Intellectual Disabilities Score High in Empathy
    A new study suggests that the sibling relationship between a typically-developing child and a brother or sister with an intellectual disability tends to be more supportive and empathetic than the relationship between two typically-developing siblings. Using artwork and questionnaires, researchers from Tel Aviv University (TAU) and the University of Haifa ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-01-24
  • Study: Girls Diagnosed With Autism About 1.5 Years Later Than Boys
    A new study reveals that girls with autism receive a diagnosis, on average, nearly 1.5 years later than boys. This is likely because parents and clinicians tend to notice language delays as the first sign of autism, and the girls in the study had more advanced language skills compared to ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-01-23
  • Depression Around Menopause Often Goes Undetected
    New research suggests a high number of women experience symptoms of depression during perimenopause yet the mental health issue is not detected and as a consequence, untreated. Investigators discovered almost 40 percent of women experience symptoms of depression during perimenopause. However, many health care providers do not assess or screen ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-01-23
  • Move Into Adulthood Seen As Critical Time for Obesity
    Two new studies reveal that weight again associated with leaving adolescence and moving into adulthood reflects a decrease in physical activity and changes in diet. Researchers at the University of Cambridge say the transition from adolescence into adulthood is the age when the levels of obesity increase the fastest. Many ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-01-22
  • How Does Cyberbullying Impact Young Psychiatric Inpatients?
    Cyberbullying can magnify symptoms of depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in young inpatients at an adolescent psychiatric hospital, according to a new study published in the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry. “Even against a backdrop of emotional challenges in the kids we studied, we noted cyberbullying had an adverse impact. ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-01-22
  • Smoking & Drinking in Pregnancy May Multiply SIDS Risk
    Fetal exposure to both alcohol and tobacco after the first trimester is tied to a 12-fold increased risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), according to a new study published in EClinicalMedicine, an online journal published by The Lancet. These risks were in comparison to infants who were either not ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-01-21
  • Field Study Supports Lasting Mood Benefits of Psychedelics
    In a new field study by Yale University, participants who had recently used psychedelic substances such as psilocybin (the active ingredient in “magic mushrooms”) reported a sustained improvement in mood and social connectedness after the high was gone. The findings add to the growing body of evidence suggesting that psychedelic ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-01-21
  • Oxytocin Therapy May Benefit Cocaine-Addicted Men, But Not Women
    A new study finds that oxytocin, a hormone produced naturally in the hypothalamus, has a different effect on men and women when used as a treatment for cocaine-addicted individuals with a history of childhood trauma. Previous research has shown that oxytocin can ease addiction and cravings that could result in ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-01-20
  • Study: Most Canadians With Anxiety Disorder Show Ample Recovery
    New research from the University of Toronto provides good news to those with a history of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), the most common type of psychiatric illness. Investigators reviewed three levels of recovery in a large, representative sample of more than 2,000 Canadians with a history of GAD and discovered ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-01-20
  • Autism Families Face Numerous Taxing Challenges
    A new survey of caregivers of children with autism found that families of children with autism face high physical, mental and emotional burdens. Moreover, some families are sometimes ridiculed and even accused of child abuse. Rutgers University researchers surveyed 25 caregivers of 16 children ages 2 to 20 with autism ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-01-20
  • Long-Term Drug Treatment for Schizophrenia Deemed Safer Than No Medication
    In a new study, an international team of researchers investigated the safety of very long-term antipsychotic medication for patients with schizophrenia. They found that death rates were lower when patients were taking medication compared to when they were not. The findings are published in the journal World Psychiatry. People with ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-01-20
  • Social Support May Buffer Brain Effects of Early Life Adversity
    A new study finds that people with a history of childhood adversity may be more likely to experience brain changes in adolescence that indicate an altered response to threat. However, social support may act as a buffer and reduce the negative effects of early-life stress. University of Michigan researchers analyzed ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-01-20
  • Judo Shows Promise for Kids With Autism
    Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) may benefit socially and physically from participating in judo, a martial art form that uses unarmed combat to train the mind and body, according to a new pilot study of 14 children conducted at the University of Central Florida. “While karate, a form of ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-01-19
  • Is It Time to Teach Teens ‘Safe’ Sexting?
    A new paper suggests that fear-based messages to prevent teen sexting is the wrong approach as the strategy will fail. A better tactic, say researchers from Florida Atlantic University and the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire, is to teach kids “safe” sexting. Historically, health education messages based on explaining potential harm ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-01-18
  • Faking Emotions at Work May Do More Harm Than Good
    A new analysis looks at two ways employees may try to regulate their emotions at work: surface acting and deep acting. “Surface acting is faking what you’re displaying to other people. Inside, you may be upset or frustrated, but on the outside, you’re trying your best to be pleasant or ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2020-01-18
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