Psychology News

  • Study: Suicidal Patients on Prescribed Drugs Should Be Closely Monitored
    Prescriptions for psychotropic drugs, such anti-anxiety and anti-psychotic medications, may make it easier for some patients to use the drugs in attempted suicides, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus. The researchers suggest that those at high risk for suicide with prescriptions ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-11-13
  • Despite Warnings, Benzos Still Prescribed to Older Adults
    Emerging research finds that despite years of warnings that older adults shouldn’t take benzodiazepine medications that put them at risk of injury and death, many primary care doctors are still prescribing them. A new study by University of Michigan mapped the prescription pattern of benzodiazepines in the United States, county ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-11-12
  • Work Email Can Be Counterproductive for Managers
    A new study suggests email may be just a hassle rather than a benefit for managers, unless the email is “well-managed.” In fact, researchers from Michigan State University recommend that managers can improve their performance by checking their email less often. Investigators explain that keeping up with email traffic places ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-11-12
  • Singing in Community Choir Can Ease Loneliness, Enliven Older Adults
    New research shows that singing in a community choir reduces loneliness and increases interest in life for older adults. However, participation in the choir did not improve cognition or physical function, according to researchers at the University of California San Francisco. The research came out of the program Community of ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-11-12
  • Cities with Better Parks May Have More Physically Active Citizens
    Making small improvements to a city’s ParkScore — an evaluation of a city’s park system — may be one way to encourage residents to become more physically active, according to a new study by researchers at Penn State. The Trust for Public Land created the ParkScore as an index to rank the ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-11-12
  • Study: Treatment-Resistant Depression Is Common Among Vets – And Growing
    A new study examining claims data and Veterans Health Administration records finds that the burden and costs of treatment-resistant depression among veterans is greater than previously understood. The new research also found that the economic burdens and health care utilization rates of people diagnosed with treatment-resistant depression (TRD) are far ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-11-12
  • Key to Happiness May Be Within or Without You
    A new study has found that despite the popular belief that each person holds the key to happiness in their own hands, a majority of people only agree with this if they are already happy. Those who aren’t happy are more likely to blame external factors than take responsibility for ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-11-11
  • Conversion Therapy for LGBT Kids Linked to Higher Risks of Depression & Suicide
    A new study has found that lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) youth who experience attempts by their parents or others to change their sexual orientation — often called conversion therapy — report higher levels of depression and suicidal behavior, lower levels of self-esteem, social support, and life satisfaction, as ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-11-11
  • Too Much Screen Time Linked to Anxiety & Depression in Young Children and Teens
    New research finds that more hours of screen time are associated with lower well-being in those aged 2 to 17, with the association larger for adolescents than for younger children. San Diego State University psychologist Dr. Jean Twenge and University of Georgia psychology professor Dr. W. Keith Campbell discovered that ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-11-11
  • Non-Invasive Brain Surgery Boosts Quality of Life for Parkinson’s Patients
    Focused ultrasound thalamotomy, a form of non-invasive brain surgery that uses sound waves, has been shown to improve the motor function and overall quality of life in patients with drug-resistant Parkinson’s disease, according to new research at the University of Virginia (UVA) School of Medicine. In previous research, the ultrasound ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-11-11
  • Disturbed Sleep in Grieving Spouses Linked to Greater Risk of Heart Disease
    New research shows that sleep disturbances have a strong negative impact on the immune system of people who have recently lost a spouse. The overactivated immune system of the bereaved triggered by sleep disturbances — and resulting chronic inflammation — may make them more susceptible to heart disease or cancer, ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-11-11
  • Emotional Responses of Toddlers with Autism May Presage Co-Occurring Disorders
    Symptoms of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) often surface in toddlers between 12 and 18 months. Now, new research finds that by the time a reliable diagnosis can be made (usually after 24 months), toddlers affected by autism are already displaying emotional vulnerabilities which may predict comorbid emotional and behavioral conditions ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-11-11
  • Time Spent on Social Media Linked to Mental Health Issues
    Facebook, Snapchat and Instagram may be hazardous to your mental health. The first experimental study examining use of multiple platforms shows a causal link between time spent on these social media and increased depression and loneliness, according to University of Pennsylvania researchers. The link between the two has been talked ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-11-11
  • Sleep Deprivation Can Have Severe Consequences
    In the largest experimentally controlled study on sleep deprivation to date, researchers have quantified the dire consequences of sleep deprivation. They discovered sleep loss appears to reduce our ability to manage distractions during our everyday tasks, often leading to a series of avoidable errors. In the study, Michigan State investigators ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-11-10
  • Trusting Other People May Prolong Your Life
    A new Swedish study has found that people who trust others live longer. Those who do not trust others may be shortening their lives, according to researchers from Lund University and Stockholm University. Trust in other people is sometimes described as the glue that keeps societies together, the researchers noted. ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2018-11-10
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