Psychology News

  • Lifestyle Choices Key to a Longer Life
    A new study has found that people who are overweight cut their life expectancy by two months for every extra kilogram (or about two pounds) of weight they carry. The study, from researchers at the University of Edinburgh, also found that education leads to a longer life, with almost a ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-10-14
  • Untapped Creativity in the Workplace
    Most believe that creativity and innovation are skills sets that American employers increasingly value. Therefore, art graduates and others who have developed and honed their creative skills, should be critical assets in the workplace. However, research shows that the majority of arts alumni — over 90 percent — have ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-10-13
  • Virtual Humans May Help Military Personnel Disclose PTSD Symptoms
    Military personnel are significantly more likely to disclose post-traumatic stress symptoms while being interviewed by a virtual human compared to when they are taking a computer survey, according to a new study published in the journal Frontiers in Robotics and AI. The researchers believe that the computer-generated ‘human’ interviewer offers ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-10-13
  • Brain Stimulation May Improve Athletic Performance
    European researchers have discovered that electrical brain stimulation can improve endurance and enhance athletic performance. Investigators at the University of Kent believe their findings will help to advance the understanding of the brain’s role in endurance exercise. In specific, the research will help scientists learn the way in which ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-10-13
  • Is Autism Associated with Socioeconomic Status
    Provocative new research discovers children living in neighborhoods where incomes are low and fewer adults have bachelor’s degrees, are less likely to be diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) compared to kids from more affluent neighborhoods. University of Wisconsin-Madison investigators lead the multi-institution study which reviewed if the skewed ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-10-13
  • Humor on Social Media May Negate Message
    An Australian study has found that comedic delivery of a message may reduce the effectiveness of message itself. The finding is consistent with recent findings that suggest the emotional content of a message can influence the effectiveness of the message. In the research, investigators from Queensland University discovered getting a ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-10-13
  • Resiliency Critical to Overcome Effects of Bullying
    New research suggests that since most children will experience bullying at some point in their lifetime schools, families and communities should take a more proactive role in helping children learn to be resilient. Investigators discovered the reason some children are devastated by bullying while others are not is because ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-10-12
  • Brain Chemicals Glutamate and Glycine Elevated in First-Episode Psychosis
    Young people in their first episode of psychosis show elevations in the brain chemicals glutamate and glycine, according to a new study published in the journal Biological Psychiatry. Abnormal brain activity in psychotic disorders, such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, is thought to stem in part from impaired function of ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-10-12
  • Migraines Harm Work Productivity, Stigma Persists
    A new national survey finds that a significant percentage of individuals are concerned that migraines detrimentally affect work productivity, quality of life, family/relationships and employment. The public opinion survey queried more than a thousand Americans, both people with the disease and those without. Respondents believe employers should make reasonable ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-10-12
  • Relationship Stress May Influence Heart Health in Men
    A new study discovers risk factors for heart health appear to be linked to changes over time in the quality of marital relationships — at least for men. The research provides new insights between marital status and health. Prior findings have revealed an association between marital status and health, but ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-10-12
  • Study Disputes Narcissism ‘Epidemic’ Among College Students
    New research contradicts earlier observations that college students are significantly more narcissistic than prior generations. As narcissism declines with age, younger people may be more narcissistic than older adults, but no more so than how the adults were at a similar age, say the researchers. In the study, University of ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-10-11
  • School Year Bias May Influence ADHD Diagnosis
    Researchers have discovered that younger children in elementary schools are more likely to be diagnosed with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) than their older peers within the same school year. The European study suggests that adults involved in raising concerns over a child’s behavior, such as parents and teachers, may be ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-10-11
  • Being Unaware of Memory Loss Tied to Greater Risk for Alzheimer’s
    Do you find yourself worrying about how poor your memory has been lately? This may actually be a good thing. A new Canadian study published in the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry shows that people who are aware of their memory problems are actually less likely to develop dementia or Alzheimer’s ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-10-11
  • Improve Listening to Know Others’ Emotions
    New research suggests that if you want to know how someone is feeling, it might be better to close your eyes and use your ears. Yale University investigators have discovered people are better able to detect others’ emotions when they listen and do not look at the person. “Social and ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-10-11
  • Moms Continue to Work More than Dads
    In the first study that shows how couples spend time on a minute by minute basis, researchers found evidence that gender equality is more hype than substance, even among highly educated couples. Scientists from Ohio State found that three months after the birth of their first child, on days ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2017-10-10
No feed items found.

Experience Freedom in Your Life