Psychology News

  • Daily Cannabis Can Cut Illicit Opioid Use For Those With Chronic Pain
    For people in chronic pain who are tempted to use illicit opioids, a new study reveals that cannabis can act as an effective and much less dangerous alternative to help manage pain. The findings, published in the journal PLOS Medicine, show that participants in pain who used cannabis every day ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-11-25
  • Depressed MS Patients Suffer Debilitating Symptoms Earlier
    People diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS) who also are depressed are more likely to suffer debilitating symptoms early than people with MS who are not depressed, according to a new study. Researchers at the Karolinska Institutet in Sweden say their findings highlight the need for early recognition and treatment of ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-11-24
  • Can You Be Addicted to Online Shopping?
    A new study has found that one-third of patients seeking treatment for a buying-shopping disorder (BSD) also reported symptoms of addictive online shopping. These patients tended to be younger, experienced greater levels of anxiety and depression, and were likely to exhibit a higher severity of such symptoms, according to researchers. ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-11-24
  • Illiterate People May Be Three Times More Likely to Develop Dementia
    Those who are illiterate may have nearly three times greater risk of developing dementia than people who can read and write, according to a new study published in the journal Neurology. “Being able to read and write allows people to engage in more activities that use the brain, like reading ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-11-24
  • Using Diet Pills and Laxatives Can Set Stage for Eating Disorders
    A new study has found that young women who use diet pills and laxatives to control their weight have higher odds of being diagnosed with an eating disorder. “We’ve known that diet pills and laxatives when used for weight control can be very harmful substances. We wanted to find out ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-11-24
  • What Makes Sports Fun for Kids? Winning Isn’t Everything
    While many kids love organized sports, there are probably just as many who would rather play video games. So what exactly makes youth sports fun? New research on this topic reveals some surprising results. The study found that “trying your best” and “working hard” were two of the top-rated fun ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-11-23
  • Does Parkinson’s Start in the Brain or the Gut?
    Where does Parkinson’s disease (PD) begin? In the brain or in the gut? According to new findings, both are possibilities. In a new Danish study, scientists hypothesize that PD can be divided into two subtypes: gut-first, meaning it originates in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) of the gut and spreads ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-11-23
  • CBT to Treat OCD May Not Be Enough for Some Patients
    Teens with the contamination variant of obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) are not generally more ill than young people with other forms of disabling obsessive thoughts and compulsive behavior. But a new Danish study finds that if teens with contamination OCD have poor insight into their condition, they may find it ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-11-23
  • Financial Therapy Can Help Save Marriages
    Financial therapy, which combines the emotional support of a marriage counselor with the money mindset of a financial planner, could help couples navigate disagreements, money concerns, and financial conflicts before these issues tear relationships apart. “Money is a big thing and ignoring it is impeding satisfaction in relationships,” said Megan ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-11-23
  • Brain Stimulation Can Aid Practice of Mindfulness Meditation
    Many believe our contemporary society is a haven for burnout. Perhaps as an offshoot of the information age or just an expansion of cultural change in the 21st century, many individuals live in a world of hyperconnectivity. This constant stimulation can cause stress — a risk factor for a host ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-11-23
  • New Study: Mental Illness Not Predictive of Crime or Incarceration
    A new study challenges the belief that those diagnosed with mental illness are of greater danger to the public-at-large. This issue has become prominent as policy makers seek to develop interventions to address mass shootings. Israeli researchers believe this approach, which focuses on the relationship between crime and mental ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-11-22
  • Bad Relationships With Blood Relatives Have Major Effect on Health
    Strained relationships with blood relatives, such as parents, siblings or extended family members, may be more harmful to your health than romantic partner troubles, according to a new study published in the Journal of Family Psychology. “We found that family emotional climate had a big effect on overall health, including ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-11-22
  • Sleep Deprivation Can Have Significant Impact on Cognition
    Sleep deprivation appears to affect cognition far more than previously thought, according to a large study by Michigan State University’s (MSU) Sleep and Learning Lab. The study is the first to assess how sleep deprivation impacts placekeeping, the ability to complete a series of steps without losing one’s place despite ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-11-22
  • Make A Plan to Avoid Temptations and Reach Your Goals
    People who make plans to avoid or handle temptation are more likely to achieve their goals, according to a new study. Proactively planning to manage temptations may be more effective than simply responding to temptation when it arises, notes University of Wyoming Associate Professor Ben Wilkowski and recent UW psychology ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-11-22
  • Teen Girls Increasingly Report Feeling Bored
    “I’m bored,” is a typical complaint by teens in every era, one that’s growing more common for U.S. adolescents, especially girls. Washington State University researchers have found complaints of boredom are rising year after year for teens in 8th, 10th, and 12th grades, with greater increases for girls than boys. ... read more
    Source: Psychology in the NewsPublished on 2019-11-22
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